Anticipating the next crash, this time it could be money


#1

Long Article but some interesting points, any comments, thoughts?

surplusenergyeconomics.wordpress.com/


#2

I think the Globalists will somehow use Cryptos or the strawman of Cryptos to crash Money in peoples eyes. My notional money is on 2018 and then we’ll all be (forced) to use Cryptos (eventually) but first it will be blockchain all tangible assets, for starters “earth” and everything else beside. :nin

One of the reasons I form this future outlook and there are many, is because Cryptos have given the recently technologically enabled people of earth, the keys to the vault. It takes the control away from the magicians and puts it in the audiences hand. The trick is, it’s all only a simple confidence trick. So as usual they will have to fear everyone back form the open shores of potential with the invocation of sharks near (seen) and far away (unseen).

Those already swimming couldn’t care less, they know the odds… sink or swim. they’ve rated the salty edge of freedom and are as free as can be. The question is, can the Globalists drain the planets waters of life quick enough to seize control of the dry of death and destruction they so much need to let fly a new age?

My posting is not unknown for a flight into the realm of visual semiotics. Then as we look on the 1988 cover of the economist magazine which depicts the worlds currencies in flames at the feet of the Phoenix rising it is interesting to note the following.

There appears what seems to be the year 2018 (20 year heads up?) on a coin/medallion around the neck of the Phoenix with a value of 10 (might this be representative of 1s & 0’s which powers the age of the microchip) and a further the symbol “ϕ” appearing to denote Phi

Moving along to the 2015 cover the illustration invokes a Earth or the world like a machine in chains, blockchained.

i153.photobucket.com/albums/s214/propertypin/phoenixcoin_zpsnt0ubnia.jpg

I can’t speak of alternate realities leaking form one to the other and back again like quantum waves of potential passing in the night but it is the case that beauty is truly within the eye of the beholder in at least one instance.


#3

Good link. Much thanks.


#4

I think that article is probably bollocks.

The problem isn’t monetary policy, it’s lack of profitable opportunities in markets accessible to international investors.

If I’m a US or German pension fund, how do I capture benefits of Chinese domestic growth?


#5

I concur.
It reads like the way the internet did a decade ago. bookmarked


#6

The link is to the blog rather than a specific article. So I can’t tell which one it was supposed to be. The current article is about the threat from an oil price spike. It’s not very convincing. It starts with the premise – for which no evidence in provided – that the GFC was caused by high oil prices. Then it goes into how we are imminently running out of oil so that the spike will be repeated. This line of argument is tiresome and gets repeated with every cycle in oil markets. There will be scads of confirmation bias in the next few years as oil prices do indeed spike. But it will be because of the trillions in foregone investment that have already occurred due to the price slump since 2014.

Anyway, didn’t read any further down the blog. Seems like just another one of the many highbrow-sounding but ultimately alarmist doomster websites.


#7

I don’t really understand global pensions and debt scaremongering. So there aren’t enough savings but there’s too much debt?

Pensions are savings and one person’s savings are someone else’s debt.

How are you going to increase pensions savings without more debt?

Or is the problem distribution of debt and savings, i.e. one small group of people are holding the savings and the rest are holding the debt?

That’s surely fixable by just moving around the distributions.

If rich people won’t spend their savings then we just print money so the savings and debts are devalued.

And if that means nobody has any debt or savings and old people are starving, then we just feed the old people with the productivity of the young, like we always did.

It’s all just numbers in a machine. As long as we have enough food to eat and building materials to house ourselves, we’ll figure something out.

Seems like the scaremongers always have a vested interest, like they cashed out of stocks or bonds and are suffering from mega FOMO.


#8

Too many retirees per worker. Not enough production to support all of them at the level of comfort they expect.

It will be ameliorated by moving the distributions. No-one will starve, but it won’t be pleasant.

You are right in that it can’t really be solved by savings at the global level, that will just reduce demand and bring the problem forward.


#9

Plus automation destroying large numbers of jobs that were considered ‘sustainable’. Collapsing the recoverability of new debts, and slowing the velocity of money.


#10

Those Japanese better get a move on with their robot testing.


#11

Its this one from 10/9/17.


#12

Thanks SC. Good article, as far as it goes. Maybe I’m being too critical but it seems short on specifics. How much debt is too much, how much QE ? Apart from the erudite-sounding lingo, how is this different from “stuff is gonna happen” doom-mongering? It would be nice to have people put their reputations on the line with specific stats and predictions, rather than just storing up a bunch of potential “told you so’s”.


#13

The day people lose confidence in fiat currencies, that means the World is already doom - a nuclear war/holocaust for instances.