Antifa


#1

Mini-hands seems to have jumped precisely the wrong way on this Nazi rally business. The first stirrings of criticism now from some Republican grandees other than McCain and Graham. Will be interesting to see if Bannon lasts the week.


#2

Or that hateful little yoke Stephen Miller. Both of them were supposed to have been around when the original everyone’s-to-blame statement was being crafted. I reckon Gorka is the next to go.


#3

Pretty difficult to do, you’d have thought.


#4

Small hands make the bigliest salutes.


#5

Yeah, condemning neo-nazis should be the political oratory equivalent of falling off a log. But no. Keith Olbermann referred to Trump’s remarks as “Praising with faint damnation”. David Duke and Richard Spencer were reportedly delighted with his response.


#6

Oh, okay, it gets worse: bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40943425

We have only the finest Nazis in Trump Tower, let me tell you! Bigly.


#7

which would actually make it take much much longer until you have an election: first of all it’s practically impossible in a large population to “make sure” that not a single ineligible voter votes. Secondly, even if it was possible, it would be a license for the incumbent to take a very looong time putting those measures in place, and delay election indefinitely.

Are you using “people” in the sense of Volk here, or is it just slack grammar/typo?

I’d emphasise that these things are messy and non-digital. In any large system, it’s unlikely that you can get it to zero ineligible votes cast, just like it’s unlikely you’ll ever get 100% of eligible voters to vote. However I’d expect that in the scenario you describe, the tension between both sides will keep some rein on things.

Also, there’s more to voter “fraud” than ineligible voters casting votes, can also include gerrymandering and eligible voters being discouraged/disenfranchised.

sounds encouraging.

Other wise… RE the Turnbull Phone Call

I agree. What struck me even more was how unable he was to recognise that Turnbull was offering him an “out”, letting him know that he didn’t have to “accept” anyone, just look at them. Turnbull labours this point, but Trump just doesn’t get it, then comes around it later as if it was his idea.

The man is an idiot or unwell.


#8

Little from column A, little from column B.

At least some of what they alleged were “ghost voter” records and thus sinister proof of mass conspiracy were:
two persons of the same name registered in the same house, e.g., John Smith and his son John Smith, registered at 1 Any Street,
voters who had recently moved house,
recently dead.

Their heads would melt right off if they had to live here, where you could quite legitimately have an electoral register with six guys called Seán Murphy, Killtownland, grandfather, father, son, uncle, cousins.


#9

You need to stop blindly believing everything you’re being told by the corrupt mainstream media. Trump has disavowed racists and hate groups many times over the years.


#10

Trump appeared on my tv saying “There was blame on both sides” and “There were many fine people” at the torchlight rally of neo-nazis and Klansmen chanting “Blood and soil”, footage of which is widely available on Youtube.
Richard Spencer’s and David Duke’s pleased responses are on Twitter.


#11

No, you’re hearing what you want to hear. He said there was many fine people (both on the left and the right) at the march. He did not claim that neo-Nazis and klansmen were fine people. Antifa are an extremely violent and intolerent hate group who are totally opposed to free speech.


#12

Full press conference
Questions start @ 6.19

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1c3IQUnyGps

(Ireland gets a mention @ 7.11)


#13

I’m sure many fine people join neo_nazi rallies and are not at all put off by the white symbols and shouts of seig heil. Who hasn’t been at a neo-nazi rally.


#14

So now you’re claiming that everyone who showed up to protest the removal of the Confederate statues joined in on the neo-Nazi rally? :unamused:


#15

Are American people who cherish the memory of ancestors in the Civil War really much different to poppy wearers in the Republic who commemorate their WW1 ancestors ?

There’s not much in it. Their ancestors were both on the wrong side of history, both supporting repugnant regimes.

If the Orange Order show up at a World War 1 commemoration is everyone else a religious bigot ? (rather than sentimental idiots)


#16

Kindly do not tell me what I heard.
He said there were fine people on both sides at the rally, so he meant some on the right. The nature of the rally was clear by Friday, when armed fascists were marching (Nazi chants, Klan robes, torches). What “fine people” then turn up on the Saturday to a rally in support of their common cause with those assholes?

And spare me the free speech talking point. That’s just taking the piss.


#17

@mollie
Are you saying, in your opinion there where ** no ‘fine people’ there ** to protest the removal of the statue of American Civil War General Robert E. Lee?


#18

This is apparently the poster of the event. Anyone who didn’t expect white supremacists is an idiot. The first speaker is a white supremacist.


#19

@pishwish
Was the rally about American ‘white supremacists’ or the removal of the statue of American Civil War General Robert E. Lee?

(Would it have been possible to protest the removal of the statue, without being in the group of American ‘white supremacists’ ? )

Can you list **all **the groups that were at these protests?


#20

Both sides have really scummy elements.

The divide and conquer agenda is coming along nicely eh. :laughing: