Audit of Celtic Tiger apartments proposed by Howlin


#1

Should provide a boost to local construction as assuming there will be problems with the bubble shyteboxes built all over the country

irishtimes.com/news/politics … -1.2380689


#2

Now that’s a can off worms to be opening…

XX XX XX


#3

I think we need to conduct an audit of pre-Bubble builds.
All those 1980’s houses and apartments must be death traps when looked at from the perspective of today’s regulations.

And the government must pay for all repairs !


#4

The biggest shocker here of course is that apartments were ever allowed be occupied without thorough fire safety inspections


#5

Do not know if this is sold in Ireland or not. Chinese drywall contaminated with K40 and radium etc. radiation. All imports should be checked by the dept of the environment. Sometimes Ireland can be a dumping ground for products, like the gmo’s that the French would not take winding up here.


#6

This is a daft suggestion. It’ll cost millions and take forever.

Just establish a whistleblowing procedure for tradesmen and workers to report on the developments where dangerous short cuts were taken. Plenty of disgruntled former employees out there, and if you really want to make the job quick and simple offer €5k for any whistleblower who successfully raises a particular issue that would be regarded as a serious and deliberate breach of the fire regulations.


#7

Will be interesting to see if the returned Bernard McNamara be asked to account for his responsibilities with regards to these developments?

Shouldnt be too difficult for the Irish media to find him, either at Denis O’brien site off Stephens Green or out with Smurfit at the K-Club.

the state will end up picking up the tab for this, yet there are those that think over burdensome regulation is to blame for the lack of new housing going on

edit - Mick Clifford article from earlier in the year - irishexaminer.com/ireland/lo … 14221.html


#8

…the true cost of shoddy boomtime home construction

It has turned from a trickle into a flow, as fire-safety issues and substandard construction work continues to be identified in an increasing number of Celtic Tiger-era developments. For owners of these properties, it’s a significant concern, and one that is likely to be expensive.
“I feel so sorry for these vendors as they are virtually trapped until a levy is agreed,” says Damien Baxter of Sandyford agent Baxter, adding that the issue seems “endemic”, with “no accountability from anyone bar owners”.
Indeed, while the Pyrite Board was established to help those stricken with pyrite in their properties, and has paid out some €92 million as of the end of 2018, last month the Government said it would not set up a redress scheme to assist owners faced with fire-safety issues and building defects in their properties.