Boom times (2016 Special Edition)


#101

Most under 30s are not recorded on those stats. we know that Dublin is choc full of students from Asa/Africa/South America supplying cheap labour to our captains of industry.


#102

Position offered €30k per year - skills: experience working with children and full driving licence - only 1 Irish applicant in 4 months who said, before even meeting us, she would only take the role if she was paid cash.

Bring on the cheap foreign labour


#103

I have had an almost identical experience. The only difference was they wanted €33k minimum to go on the books.


#104

The cheap foreign labour says ‘how about those cheap housing costs?’ Anytime soon…didn’t think so. :angry:


#105

Your perception of what the cheap foreign labour is saying is very different to my experience. Let my tell you about my cleaner… :laughing:

The harsh reality is that the low skilled Irish are sitting on their backsides, bemoaning their lack of opportunity and the foreigners who are willing to work for €15.00 per hour.


#106

There are plenty of Irish people willing to work for €15.00 per hour, in and around Dublin.


#107

Don’t hate the player, hate the game.

Anytime I’ve seen it here it’s purely the case of losing benefits.


#108

the tentacles of the 30km speed limit extend. more finesand spin offs for the council

rte.ie/news/dublin/2017/053 … ed-limits/

this is how these pricks use surveys to arrive at the decisions the pricks wanted in the first place. its a trick i see being used more and more.

"A public consultation carried out as part of a review of the by-laws found considerable opposition among respondents and scepticism that it would be enforced.

Of the 550 responses, 267 expressed concern that the new limits would be impractical or would cause increased congestion.

However the city council said that in door-to-door surveys, 78% of residents were in favour of the new limit."


#109

I’m skeptical of these new speed limits, but I have read various credible analyses that suggests an overall increase in quality of life (specifically for pedestrians (all of us!) and cyclists) when cars are forced to slow down. (Happy City by Charles Montgomery worth a read). Find myself quite split on the subject.

Fast moving vehicles are definitely not good for other users of public space, but I don’t know how exactly to measure the trade offs (I’ve seen various measures put forward, but I don’t have a really informed opinion on whether they’re meaningful or not).


#110

The less private cars on the roads the better, the slower the death causing machines ( :wink: ) go, the better.
Seriously, look around next time you are traffic and see how many are occupied by one person. You can remove a lot of cars from Dublin without affecting the economy.
Further, I’d remove a lot of on-street parking, which is occupied by private users for selfish gain, and convert it into more space for pedestrians, cyclists, seating areas, trees, play areas…
twitter.com/travis_robert/statu … 4608244736


#111

Given average real world speed cars achieve in most of those areas is something like 20-25kph is it really that big a deal?


#112

It’s not an issue in slow moving traffic. You are concentrating more heavily and going through the required adjustments. This kind of driving is stressful anyway over a long period.

It’s frankly a distraction when there isn’t heavy traffic. The car does not want to ‘sit’ comfortably at 30km/h, in most cars I’ve driven this is very close to where you’d push into third from second, and so the speed isn’t comfortably between the ideal points to change gears. It becomes a distraction to keep at 30km/h as a result, as the throttle is quite sensitive at this point.

My experience of the limit on the Dublin quays is that the traffic tends to travel between 35 and 40km/h. The cars can typically sit at this speed comfortably in 3rd gear, (or maybe cruise in 4th at a push) and don’t feel the slight judder of the car almost wanting 2nd. I know what 2k-2.5k revs feels like in my petrol car, and if I’m pottering along comfortably in 3rd I know I’m doing in and around 35. To do 30 I will be in low revs in 3rd and the whole experience is distracting between watching speed and getting the right gear.

Perhaps this is the intention of the 30km/h limit, knowing people will break by 5-10 and keeping a resultant average speed below 40.


#113

This issue is often cars speeding at 50-60kph between traffic junctions.
I see a lot of this within a mile or two of the canals.
This speeding won’t change - as enforcement will be patchy at best. This is Ireland.
And where there is enforcement, I can already guess some of the straight and safer routes it’ll be on… shooting fish etc etc.


#114

and the reason for the flower boxes placed to block cyclists having a clear run is…

careful what you wish for

anyways, Dublin is being handed over to the private operators of public transport, pay the tram man, pay the bus man. pay the train man.


#115

I live in one of the estates that got a 30kph zone this week. And all I can say is: finally.
Maybe people will start doing 40-50kph now instead of 60-80 at some of the stretches.

it is amazing how many people drive way too fast down a narrow road with cars parking on both sides and not enough room for two cars to pass by each other. All that an area with a lot of kids running around, elderly people, etc.


#116

Cyclists cause traffic jams too:

Copenhagen cycle jams tackled with electronic information panels

amp.theguardian.com/world/2017/ … congestion

And electric cars will be the silent killer.

They should get rid of the Luas, build an underground, and make the Luas line a bikeway.


#117

That article says “Danish capital last year saw more bicycles enter city than cars”. Is there anything close to as much space given to cyclists as to motorists?

Of course cyclists - and pedestrians - can cause traffic, but they do so at far higher density thresholds than cars do.


#118

The Yanks etc have mostly gone so Paddy is back and going full throttle

Cairn Homes to buy RTÉ land at Donnybrook for €107.5m
Irish listed property group significantly outbid rivals for prime site in Dublin 4
irishtimes.com/business/comm … -1.3118057

What stage of the cycle are we at now?


#119

Forgive me, but is that over 200k per unit for the site alone? :open_mouth:


#120

i wonder what they will do with the site , and surely they will find a way to get out of the social housing aspect

cant imagine a high density development there