Comic relief: Several agents should make house sell faster

:angry: thepropertypin.com/viewtopic.php?t=7932

Shane Ross as estate agent

except Liz O’Kane, of course.

daft.ie/1337190 time on market: 7 months

tick, tock.

Sorry vearing off topic:

Can’t remember what thread it was on, but does anyone know if Matt Cooper has any joy selling his house?

I did hear Ray D’arcy mention that he had recently sold his own place in “old” Sandyford, don’t think it had been on the market that long 2 or 3 months.

Of course you can have multiple agents. It is just a contract. That bird is daft as a brush.

We did that in the UK. Gave one agent first bite for a number of weeks and then moved to a dual agent with winner take all fee. Some agents won’t do winner take all, but it is the only way it can work.

I don’t actually see what special skills an estate agent has that anyone else doesn’t have. Stick an ad on Daft and read the idiots guide to haggling (and gazumping). Save yourself a few grand.

It’s a more common practice outside Dublin I think. Certainly in Tralee I’ve seen a few houses listed with two agents on occasion.

Ha ha!!!

You forgot that to emulate most estate agents you need to be able to lie through your teeth, perpetually!

Can you put an ad on myhome.ie if you’re not an EA?

Actually it is not very rare in Co. Galway to have house on sale by three agents.

For example this one:
myhome.ie/residential/search/bro … XRBI349742
daft.ie/1339158
daft.ie/1316576

Note that every agent is selling house in different location, so I think they indeed compete between themselves on “added value” :wink:

Here is one with two agents and owner competing, with interesting price differences:
privateseller.ie/137
myhome.ie/residential/search … UAPO274950
daft.ie/1254304

As a desperate buyer I keep a watch on Galway market, and I would say that for properties older than 3 months it would be unusual to be listed by one agent. Of course this statement is pure guess, a have no number to support it. I would say then that inventories are much lower that daft number would suggest.

I think that’s rather rough, BrendanG.

Estate agents, per se, for a long time, provided a point of contact between buyers and sellers. They also had a reasonable feel for their industry. I think the issue - and I’m pretty sure that a couple of our resident estate agents would agree - is that in a bubbling property market, it is very hard to be bad at selling houses. Now the industry has changed because we have new points of contact between buyers and sellers, plus there are a lot of people in the industry who literally only had to turn up and say things like “ample storage space” and “interesting aspect on (some thing that you’d get bored by in 2 minutes)”. Estate agents didn’t actually have do deal with reality per se either because for every one realistic buyer who had an eye on valuie for money plus utility minus cost of mortgage, there were ten who desperately wanted to buy and didn’t ask the hard questions. So it was for me four years ago “What are the management fees onthis place?” “I don’t know. It’s not sorted out yet” and the apartment still gets sold within a week having been bid up 25%…

To emulate most estate agents now, you really have to not have a clue how to deal with a normal market. A lot of estate agents relied on demand. It isn’t there. Now they can’t cope. Some of them - yes - are economical with reality but you’ll find that for a lot of part, a significant number are waking up and smelling the coffee. Hence on the ground comments that sub-asking price offers of up to 20% might well be entertained when even 12 months ago…they’d laugh at you.

Business is down. They know it. They know that the rules of the game have changed. The people who are currently lying are the vendors who have convinced theirselves that property only goes up. They are lying to themselves.

I do, however, wish that estate agents would take lessons in writing. They all write exactly the same blurb. “Unique opportunity this” “Fantastic opportunity that for investors and first time buyers alike”. That last one smacks of desperate. “Won’t anyone buy this damn thing?” I know it’s marketing speak, and I know that they have a mandate to extoll the virtues of a place but there are 250,000 words in the English language and estate agents appear to only know about 20.

True it’s rather rough and I did qualify it with “most”

Unfortunately through my dealings with EA’s over the last 18 months, firstly selling and laterly renting I have encountered repeated lies, that’s talking to 5 different EA firms all of which have lied to me at least once, some everytime I have spoken to them!

Obviously we can’t tar everyone with the same brush but we can only speak from experience.

My experience has been very similar to BrendanG, in that every estate agent I have ever talked to has lied or misled me in some way. From trying to keep a rental deposit after completing a 12mnt lease, to blatantly lying about particulcar aspects of a rental property, to lying about current bids on houses.

There ARE decent estate agents out there but the greedy/immoral/lying agents are much more plentiful and give the profession a bad name.

Someone should setup a secret shopper program for Estate Agents. Have them independently audited and have the IAVI kick them out if they are found to be lying.

Lizwatch continues! :laughing:

I do, however, wish that estate agents would take lessons in writing. They all write exactly the same blurb. “Unique opportunity this” “Fantastic opportunity that for investors and first time buyers alike”. That last one smacks of desperate. “Won’t anyone buy this damn thing?” I know it’s marketing speak, and I know that they have a mandate to extoll the virtues of a place but there are 250,000 words in the English language and estate agents appear to only know about 20

You learn something new every day. I would have tought that there were far more than 1/4M words. off topic - don’t shoot me TUG