Disturbing! Pfizer vaccine zoomed w/ microscope? are living cells/ organisms mixed in?

coronavirus
vaccine

#1

#2

#3

Best analogy so far - Lipid layer. Fatty substance that is made of the same thing as your cell walls. You can tell because it’s hydrophobic. Helps the MRNA get your cells. In other words, it’s the lube. I’m guessing the little white things are the instructions. Strands joined in at the loop 3’ and 5’ ends so they are active. The black lines are the edge of water’s surface tension. The motion is most like likely currents produced by the heat of microscope’s light.


#4

I was thinking each mRNA strand was in it’s own lipid, taking a nieve leaf from the various illustrations, but then it turns out, there are clearly many per lipid.

Src: https://www.americanpharmaceuticalreview.com/Featured-Articles/364236-Recent-Advances-in-Lipid-Nanoparticle-Mediated-mRNA-Therapy/

Yet the small white things moving around might be the same as in figure B?

IF they are, then what is the other structure, that looked like it is wrapped somewhat by those water tension lines, if that is what they are.


#5

@Open_Window- Excellent! This discovery is just evolving, I guess we will find out soon enough when the qualified put all vaccines under a digital microscope @ freezing temperatures? Some explaining is definitely needed? How about Fauci or Kill Gates or even our own Luke O Neill?


#6

Guys I think that is most likely the electronic groups that would have been attached to the cholesterol fatty chains causing that movement. They will be reacting with the solution they are in. There would be plenty of forces on these micelle structures that will move them along in solution and could make them look alive. The micelle structure will have electronic groups on it, Hydroxyl groups, there will be hydrophobic parts and hydrophilic parts. You could even add in brownian motion causing some movement.
The main worry I have is that these are colossal structures with all sorts of molecular groups on them being put into the body. Who knows what they could be doing in many parts of the body, let alone the fact that the siRNA are then getting into cells to cause even more chaos. It could all potentially work, in theory, but it’s so messy that it would need years of testing to make sure it’s safe. They seem to have skipped the testing. This seems inexplicable to me, there is no way they felt that this could be 100% safe and it feels as if they saw an opportunity to bypass years of testing by scaring people.
Remember the dangers of just having one wrong enantiomer of Thalidomide in a small percentage. The thing about Thalidomide is that when they make it, a tiny percentage of the molecule they make, is a mirror image of the molecule they want. It’s this mirror image that did all the damage, and just randomly, for a short few weeks of pregnancy. And, it took 5 years for the world to link the birth defects to Thalidomide. Other times this is harmless and the (non-mirror image of the) molecule is perfectly safe all the time.
These new colossal micelle structures have all sorts of parts sticking out of them, they are made in a messy fashion. Feels to me like there are numerous ways they could go wrong.


#7

The reason why mRNA and subunit vaccine candidates failed the regulatory process in the past is for precisely the reasons you outlined. They mostly worked as expected, in fact very well, but there were enough odd low frequency oddities to set of every alarm bell. Its the low frequency oddities that cause the big problems once the product goes into general circulation.

Funny you should mention Thalidomide as I use this as an example of how the regulatory process can go very seriously wrong. One FDA regulator in the US refused to accept the trial data supplied by the developer and as a result was never given general approval in the US. So Thalidomide was mostly a European tragedy. It was not uncommon to see kids with no limbs when I was growing up. The Thalidomide babies.

My gut feeling is the all the SARs Cov2 vaccines apart from the attenuated virus vaccines will turn out to have common and long term serious side effects. And not the just high rate of sudden death from cardiac arrest and anaphylactic shock immediately after vaccination. I have real fears that the side effects could be so severe that they will serious damage peoples trust in all vaccines. Something that really would kill millions of people in the next few decades.


#8

It couldn’t possibly be some weirdo billionaire WEF board member with an obsession for finding eternal life-including consuming the blood of living human beings-and a distaste for proper vaccine testing and whose company got the contract to analyse the data from the UK and USA injections behind it, could it? That sounds like the plot of a dystopian sci-fi horror film…

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/on-leadership/peter-thiels-life-goal-to-extend-our-time-on-this-earth/2015/04/03/b7a1779c-4814-11e4-891d-713f052086a0_story.html


#9

Actually they have not skipped the testing. They got a waiver so technically every person vaccinated is participating in a early stage Phase III Clinical Trial.

Given the usual time line for the approval process its actual more of a Phase II trial than a Phase III trial. But Phase II trials usually dont involve hundreds of million of people for a completely novel and untested vaccine which failed the approval process on multiple occasions in the past.

I wonder how many people who got vaccinated signed one of these?

None perhaps.

Thats why the drug companies got product liability waivers.


#10

I was being slightly facetious when I was saying ‘skipped the testing’ but yes, this is exactly what I was getting at. It could all work out, but if it doesn’t, this will be looked back on in Chemistry textbooks with disbelief. It goes against everything that you are taught on day 1, lesson 1 of Organic Chemistry.
Just as an aside, most medical students hate Chemistry. There is 1 in a class of 30 that usually gets it. They will all tell you it’s the worst part of their studies.
I’m still keeping my fingers crossed that it all works out safely enough (it’s all relative of course).


#11

The movement wasn’t what concerned me when I saw it, from the OP’s link but the various elements and structural variety and scales as you say, “colossal structures”. I expected clear (fluid) and maybe tiny things like that which were moving about but not all that complex and mostly inert structure.

I didn’t think anything was alive but yes movement would give normal untrained observation the illusion or sense something is possibly alive, it’s hardwired into our perception, threats etc. etc.

It may be interesting to note that twitter are fast to remove this video if posted in a tweet.


#12

People who thought they were being saved or doing the right thing are now dead. Lots and lots of them.

There is a growing view emerging that it may come to pass that people will know more dead or damaged folk from getting the injections than they will ever have heard of or known anyone succumbing to the Attack Of The Virus.

The anecdotes online are increasing out there and the frequency also increasing in a manner that bare no comparison to similar for last years event. The similarities of the anecdotes is also an interesting feature.


#13

Just to be clear Open_Window, I completely agree with everything you are saying on the dangers of these Liposomes. The only thing I am mentioning is that the Liposomal microscope images above are quite common for these type of structures. Due to the combined hydrophobic and hydrophilic nature of these structures they create loads of bizarre patterns.
We can see how bizarre they act in the test tubes given their nature, who knows all of the ramifications of their behaviour in the body. Part of my previous studies related to this area. At the time, I thought we were decades away from putting these things into use. I find the industry a bit unethical so I didn’t want to work in it after my studies and managed to do fine in an alternative field.


#14

Interesting @EconomicCrashDummy" I thought we were decades away from putting these things into use. I find the industry a bit unethical" The Artificial Intelligence technology has speeded up the process and the neuroscientists realize this, that’s why they are advocating for " the five neurorights" for Protecting human rights and promoting ethical innovation in the fields of Neurotechnology and AI.

https://nri.ntc.columbia.edu/
https://neurorights-initiative.site.drupaldisttest.cc.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/content/The%20Five%20Ethical%20NeuroRights%20updated%20pdf_0.pdf


#15

Just clarifying that I meant the Pharma industry in general to be unethical but good points above Matrix. Also, there are some great things the Pharma industry does but the idea of sometimes putting profits over health doesn’t sit well with me.


#16

Any suggestions why medical students might hate chemistry?


#17

They want to deal with people not molecules.


#18

For as long as I can remember, since the late '70’s, people who wanted a career in science but were not very good at mathematics and the very rigorous analytical stuff went into the bio sciences. The people who were good at mathematics went into physics, chemistry and if more interested in the applied end the various engineering areas. Almost by definition bio-science people are the people for who mathematics is not their strong point.

Which is why they tend to hate the obligatory chemistry and physic units. The analytical skills that make you good at mathematics make you good at chemistry and physics. Although I have noticed that people who loved the pure mathematics end of the subjects tent to hate organic chemistry. Whereas I loved it.

So whenever reading bio-scince research papers of textbooks the first thing I do is try to get a feel of just how strong the authors grasp of mathematics is. Are they using black box equations and techniques without understanding the principals and limitation. So a quick look at how they use the relevant math and then looks at the conclusions.

In at least 80% of published bio-science papers the strength of the conclusion is not based on the mathematics used in the paper. Like basing a conclusion on a very small non random sample with a confidence interval so wide you could drive a truck through it.

Saying that all the most useless papers written on SAR 2 in the last year were written by chemists, physicist, comp-sci people etc. Who wrote their papers with a very strong grasp of mathematical and models and completely oblivious to the relevant published bio-science literature. The 10% / 20% of the published bio-science literature where the authors have a good understanding of the relevant mathematics is usually first rate science.

The most recent example was some guy arguing that facemasks worked because of some paper that “proved” it. The paper was written by a bunch of civil-engineers who used mannequins in the experiment unaware it seems that mannequins were shown long ago to be useless when assessing actual protection of facemask in the real world. Mannequins having smooth surfaces which easily form air tight seals whereas real human faces are rough and irregular and dont easily form air tight seals .

And that was one of the less idiotic papers. The comp-sci people trying to do epidemiological modeling now those papers were uniformly terrible. Ignoring 150 years of historical data and fairly complete physical spread models for starters

So it definitely goes both way.


#19

#20

MAN WALKS OUT OF PHARMACIES WITH VAX VIALS, OVERNIGHTS THEM TO DIAGNOSTICS LABS… RESULTS SOON!