Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches needed


#721

no i didnt :laughing: thank god.

where are you getting this information that a significant number of landlords have experienced 90% of capital appreciation?


#722

I didn’t say that. I asked if you didn’t agree that a very significant capital appreciation of the last five years wasn’t a guiding influence on a significant number of other landlords choosing to sell their properties. Not a very controversial question I would have thought.


#723

you keep using the word significant, where are you getting that a significant number of landlords have have 90% capital appreciation,

and im guessing where you say other landlords you are making another incorrect assumption about me, you should refrain from doing that you make yourself look foolish.


#724

Sorry dude. You’ve run out of credit. Find another thread to troll.


#725

good man, best make a strategic withdrawal before anyone else calls you out on making stuff up


#726

Shoo. This is a good thread. Don’t try and ruin it.


#727

Being discussed on RTE Radio One. Roisin Shorthall got a bit skewered by question about whether higher deposits would be required to cover longer notice periods, and suggested that it can be addressed by tweaking existing regulations.


#728

You cannot dismiss another poster like that, especially a long established poster, who is asking valid questions of the points you are making. He/she was not trolling and you had no right to call them such.
Very ignorant


#729

I’m not interested. Form a support group.


#730

The recently introduced rent legislation taught all private landlords a very good lesson - increase rents to the max at every available opportunity. The government will penalize you for giving individual tenants a deal.

Dublin values are in fact down 30% in ten years - very few private landlords entered the market in the last 5 years (ignoring the REITs - who now own almost 3% of the residential rental stock).

In fact many of the landlords exiting are sucking up large capital losses to get out of the market. There must be a reason why - maybe they just don’t like the tenants they have been subsidizing for years.


#731

as long as you invent a narrative to suit your argument people will call you out on it, you cant expect a free reign to peddle your agenda.

For the record i am not and have never been a landlord. You dont have to have a vested interest to have a contrarian view.


#732

Really - can you provide any backup to that statement :slight_smile:


#733

Any evidence to support that claim? At most, some of them have seen their capital losses reduced massively over the last five years and are getting out nursing their wounds. To try to dismiss the price appreciation as a factor would be silly. The statistics might be showing that the number of private landlords is falling but that’s actually a function of inflated prices blocking new entrants.


#734

so which is it, that they are making massive capital gains or the are seeing reduced capital losses :mrgreen:


#735

Landlords aren’t all just one person.


#736

One person or many - does it make a difference?

The reality is that prices are down 30% over the last 10 years. However your point that price appreciation in the last 5 years have have reduced their capital losses is perfectly valid.


#737

Meanwhile, across the water they’ve found the answer…(and given that half of London’s rough sleepers are foreign nationals - it should all work out superbly.)

msn.com/en-ie/news/uknews/j … spartandhp
The Labour Party has promised to provide 8,000 homes to solve the growing homelessness crisis in Britain if Jeremy Corbyn wins power. Appearing on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show, the Labour leader said the scale of homelessness in the UK was “disgusting” and “wholly unnecessary”, and said he would fix the issue by* making a home available for every rough sleeper as soon as possible *if he wins the next election.


#738

I would be quite happy if notice periods for landlords and tenants were increased to three months…providing that three months’ deposit in an escrow account became the industry standard. (This is normal in countries not far away).

You would hear howls of protest from many tenants about how it was unjust, discriminatory, who has that sort of money, etc.

The fact is that short notice periods suit a lot of tenants who are young and want to seek work elsewhere, have transitory lifestyles, are moving in or out of relationships and the like.

The legal framework should promote sensible minimums but also allow contractually stricter terms if desired by tenant and landlord. There are actually lots of tenants and landlords out there who would like longer-term leases but there is no way to set this up and enforce at present.


#739

Let’s make a new town!
We’ll call it Clonburris, stick it between Lucan and Clondalkin, and nudge 21,000 people to live there
lovindublin.com/news/dublin-is- … 000-people


#740

A good news story?