Ireland's two-track economy;Don't wait for foreign investors

thejournal.ie/ida-visits-ove … 9-Nov2014/

Outisde the big cities there is no interest.
If multi-nationals aren’t visiting to view sites they aren’t anywhere near ready to invest.
I suppose it doesn’t help when they see the limited public transport and flight connectivity and on top of that the insistence of Government on tolling the motorway links that traverse the nation.

There is a very good reason why MNC don’t locate in small towns :slight_smile:

Looks like someone screwed up that table a bit. what’s the list on the right for?
Longford; null point (spoken in my best eurovision voice)

I will confess that my observation of the small town mentality is that they hope that new employers come to town so that there is more activity but not necessarily skilled low paying jobs for themselves rather that they can buy a rental property in a less salubrious part of town and rent it out to the newcomers and be on the pigs back for the rest of their lives.

It’s the counties sorted by number of visits.

I’m surprised Limerick is ahead of Galway and almost a match for Cork!
Any time I’ve visited Limerick recently it’s been pretty awful, the city utterly dead and decrepit.
Perhaps it’s the University keeping it ticking over.

The Westmeath figure is surprising. Is that an Athlone/Elan effect?.

Yay for monocity thinking!

On paper Limerick would make more sense than Galway for certain types of operation.

I swear, the country is becoming so lopsided that it’ll start tilting into the Irish sea.

It’s mainly the presence of Shannon Airport, but the University helps as well. Cities/large towns with good technical colleges and good industry links are doing well at attracting interested parties. IT Athlones links with Ericssons probably the reason for Athlones prominence.

Definitely. I’ve applied for numerous MNC jobs in the past and they’ve all been clustered around the main cities (but not Dublin so much, very little manufacturing until you get a good way in the commuter belt).

Yes it is but i think we have to get away from the previous strategy of bringing in Multinationals and producing our own Medium to Large companies. MNC should always have been a short term strategy of bring them in, copy and improve but sheer laziness and complacency seem to be the modus operandi. If Irish companies got a fraction of the support and breaks that MNCs got the country would be better off.

Was at some events at the Web Summit and got chatting to a few people. It seems that there is interest in locating outside of Dublin but the Airport is the main issue. Apparently US companies view the airport as a lifeline. European companies not so much but the Europeans are very unimpressed by our rail infrastructure in particular - they can’t understand why we don’t ‘shrink’ the country with high speed rail links. 250kph trains are pretty much standard in Europe now. With a limited stop setup (a political nightmare I know but we have to grow up) this probably gives you Galway in an hour, Cork in 1.5, Limerick in 1.25, Sligo in 1.5. With a proper link to the fast trains from the airport then I think we could be in a position to sort the imbalance. It will, of course, take money - but it will be less than we managed to find to pay off the banks and at least our kids will benefit from it.

The big issue driving this is the cost of rents in Dublin, and the quality of that accomodation. There seem to be a few companies (even US companies) who are setting up successfully outside of Dublin (even in the North West). I also heard about one IT company who found a developer outside of Dublin and have set them up in an office in their home town, now many of the non-indigenous workers have asked to transfer down there and it sounds as if the company is going to accomodate them. None of the Irish workers of course! This might be a sensible approach for companies that need a Dublin presence for customers/executive meetings but can do their development remotely (and who don’t want to go the Indian route).

As to the point about increasing indigenous support. I’d love to think it would work but my experience (in the IT industry) suggests that the VCs who support indigenous companies (and you need them more than the government) look to an early sell up so that the company usually ends up as part of an MNC and the number of jobs either declines or remains static. The money from the sale is then ‘invested’ in a nice house in Dublin and the seller tinkers away looking for the ‘next big thing’. To be fair this is also the endgame for most US IT startups as well - the MNCs work on the basis that if it complements your strategy - buy the company and keep the IP and the best developers, if it’s a rival - buy the company, ‘merge’ (i.e. kill) the product and keep the best developers.

Half of Irish Growth Miracle is Accounting Trickery? - → trueeconomics.blogspot.co.uk … racle.html

What’s Gurdiev’s promotion strategy? Get promoted back to Russia?