Je suis Corbyn (+UK GE 17) For The Many not the few


#823

I’d say Theresa May is facing a Hard Breakfast this morning.
:-GC


#824

I bet Bernier loved ringing her this morning asking her about the start of brexit talks!


#825

Here’s an interesting chart

It’s a comparison of two of the main pollsters Survation, who got continuously attacked by the Tabloids for their method (but proved to be the most accurate) and ICM, who are used by The Sun.

Very suspect polling.


#826

:laughing:

In the old days a result this bad would’ve been a 8DD breakfast then XX


#827

Seems a bit confused - they’re still the biggest party, and there isn’t an obvious stable coalition for Labour. Why would Corbyn be PM?


#828

The Blairites are really out of touch now. Alastair Cambell and David Miliband have both tweeted that this is a rejection of Brexit which is nonsense. What saved Labour was that they agreed “Brexit means Brexit” and moved the battle to the NHS and Government services.


#829

Corbyn is not real change. His politics is exactly that of the 1970’s. Look through the old issues of Marxism Today from the 1970’s or 1980’s and you will find Jeremy Corbyns polices and world view. In toto. He’s political world is the world of 1971. He is by far the most reactionary political leaders in Europe, apart from the leader of what was the former East German Communist Party ( a.k.a Die Linke), Katja Kipping. She wants the GDR back.

Back in the 1970’s his political breathern actively tried to subvert democracy, almost succeeded, and ended up bankrupting the country leading eventually to the IMF bailout of 1976. Funny how you never see any documentaries about the national bankruptcy of the UK in the 1970’s. The IMF set all Labour government budgets from 1977 to 1979.

Or that almost every last single major industry nationalized by Labour governments over the years are now pretty much all gone. Whats left just a pale shadow of what was there before. Whereas these industries survived and often prospered in Germany and France. The only industrial sectors of the UK economy that survived and prospered in the post war years are those that were not nationalized, or “rationalized” by Labour governments. Yet Corbyn is a Clause IV die hard. He wants it back. And not just in theory.

And those who go on and on about terrible rail service are too young just how terrible British Rail was. It was a third world service near the end. Endless rail strikes and really truculent staff. That’s where term jobs-worth came from. Because that was the default manner workers in the nationalized industries used to treat their customers,

Those of us old enough to remember politics in the 1970’s and 1980’s heard all his tired old shite back then. And always spouted by the same kind of comfortable middle class tossers. Or in the case of Seumas Milne, very upper class tosser. Corbyns circle of very well to do folk, or folk who did exceptionally well out of the system, is a perfect replica of the Militant Tendency. The people behind the scenes in these “revolutionary” marxist movements had almost as many public school / OxBridge types as Tory head office in Smith Square.

And nothing has changed in the last 40 years. Neither Corbyn, his policies or the mostly very privileged people around his political type.


#830

May is going to Buckingham Palace today as she believes she can form a Government. That was quick, they must’ve been talking to the DUP in the days before this.


#831

Funny comment doing the rounds about how the DUP manifesto is “basically just the bible, with fortnightly bin collections”.


#832

@jmc, Do you actually believe the stuff you write? Serious question.


#833

This is going to be bad.

Theresa May reaches deal with DUP to form government after shock election result
theguardian.com/politics/20 … rn-ireland


#834

:open_mouth: Dare you question the Jeopolitical Master Class!

Good question, though. He did say he was wrong however, so fair play. Not sure if I can follow his musings on the 70ies UK, but of course I was too young and in the wrong country.


#835

If there was ever a good reason for the SF w***ers to turn up in Westminster, then surely this is one.


#836

Paul Nuttall of UKIP has resigned.


#837

The hardest of hard borders is now inevitable.


#838

A wall? :nin


#839

Why? They were elected on a mandate to not sit in Westminster. Why would they go back on that, particularly when it wouldn’t make any difference to the outcome. It would be silly.


#840

That was quick! Vinny B last night and Morning Ireland this AM were discussing how DUP holding the balance of power could lead to a soft brexit as it would be in most DUP’s supporters best interests…trade with the South etc.
But it looks like the strength of the Union trumps absolutely everything else


#841

But who will pay for the wall? :slight_smile:

It’ll certainly feel like a wall for the farmers.


#842

The clue is in their name.

Well the problem with unionist type identity politics is that it can be easily eroded by economics.