Justice Peter Kelly - A one judge ass-kicking machine


#21

Then again, for a senior judge to openly comment on the fact is an encouraging new development.


#22

Encouraging in one way, a fucking awful indictment of our supposed Republic in another. :frowning:

Separation of powers is just great; unless one part feels free to just fecking ignore another part !

Imagine the shit-storm if the Judiciary just decided to ignore the Dail passing a new set or Laws, there’d be fecking uproar. But if the Dail, & it’s proxy, the DPP decides to ignore the Judiciary, then everything’s just hunky dory.

I despair :frowning: XX


#23

I take your point, and agree of course.
I suppose the DPP has to have the autonomy to decide what is in the national interest to pursue (or not), and what is prosecutable on the available evidence (or not). But surely there should be some accountability … if even the judiciary is mystified as to what happens to their cases, what the hell chance has the man in the street of finding out what’s going on !!! In this day and age why should there not be some kind of audit trail of all this on the web, for instance. It’s OUR FRICKIN’ COUNTRY, after all (or so I was once led to believe, by someone probably as naive as meself).


#24

It’s the examples he gave of cases already referred:

Michael Lynn - Solicitor
Thomas Byrne - Solicitor
Breifne O’Brien - Gobshite

If ever there were guaranteed home runs it was this bunch of eejits.

If they can’t/won’t jail the ones with their hands in the air, for fear of losing, then the ones with two fingers in the air must look positively frightening.


#25

According to Kelly, Justice Frank Clarke also thought it “very surprising indeed” that little action had been taken about struck-off solicitor Thomas Byrne despite Mr Byrne’s admissions in court about practices in which he had engaged.

irishtimes.com/newspaper/bre … ing26.html

Presumably “very surprising indeed” is judge language for “fucking outrageous”.

I see on the DPP’s website that “The DPP prosecutes cases on behalf of the people of Ireland, not on behalf of any one individual; For this reason, the views and interests of the victim cannot be the only consideration when deciding whether or not to prosecute”.

dppireland.ie/brief-guide-to … ategory/2/

Well, that should be easy then – in this case the people of Ireland ARE the victim, so no divergence of interest. Also: “certain people may ask the DPP to review a decision he has made; These include a victim of a crime;”. So, we are within our rights to write to:

Director of Public Prosecutions,
14 - 16 Merrion Street,
Dublin 2,
Ireland

… and ask (politely) what the f&*k is happening. Anyone interested in a concerted letter-writing campaign? :angry:


#26

seeing as a lot of the delay is being put down to a surfeit of lawyers and legal involvement could we start with some lawyer culling?
Take out 1/3 commercial lawyers on a completely unbiased Random basis.
pour encourager les autres?


#27

Given that there’s an oversupply of lawyers I suspect many would agree with you as the result would be to shore up fees.


#28

This is the kicker; the autonomy of the DPP is a joke; they’re Political appointees, they’re usually about as autonomous as Bosco was !

Just because we can’t see the hand up his hole doesn’t mean we’re thick enough to believe it isn’t there. :imp:


#29

FF tore 5 shades of sh&t out of his budget back around 2005 and have been hammering him on resources for fear of exposure until 9 weeks ago. FG/L haven’t up-ed his resources since and he doesn’t want to get this case wrong, so he is taking his time.


#30

When I saw the headline to this story earlier I just knew immediately who the bewigged would be… (yep, it’s being discussed on another thread, but we haven’t had any PK kudos lately)


#31

Love this guy’s attitude, can we get him cloned?

rte.ie/news/2012/0126/anglo-business.html


#32

Will the Guards accept volunteer workers?


#33

I’d be worried some of those volunteers may accidentally shred some of the more important documents by mistake.
It’s possible there is just a limit in terms of Gardai available with the skill set required to investigate the documentation and paper trail.
I’d prefer to see 50-100 new gardai recruits with financial qualifications with the expectation that they never walk the beat but purely to work on white collar crime.
Failing this surely the garda reserve could be used to beef up specialist skills that would be of use in this type of investigation?


#34

Feck off with your fancy-schmancy ‘joined-up thinking’.

Next thing you’ll be asking for open government and accountability. Pfffff.


#35

Someone once remarked that he’d never known an intelligent Garda.

In all fairness, the average Garda wouldn’t exactly be very bright. They may have to recruit from the non-Garda pool altogether.


#36

Sneery comment which is bang out of order. If you remember there was huge competition to get in a few years back - not all are rocket scientists for sure but some very bright and capable people in that force. It is a shame they have to listen to those types of comments from the populace.


#37

Name that movie.


#38

independent.ie/national-news … 09198.html


#39

While I wouldn’t question their average intelligence on an IQ scale (as it is inded harsh) I’m afraid their social intelligence comes up short based on my own personal experience with random Gardai and the people I know who are members of the force.

Personally I put it down to the low age limit at which you could join. Having not experienced living in the real world many have joined straight from their mammy’s breakfast table and therefore lack the social skills needed when dealing with members of the public.

I’ve no problem really with them recruiting young as long as there’s a mandatory “live in the real world for a short time” course.


#40

When speaking to a mature recruit I asked about the fabled brain washing in training.
He remarked that a ‘it’s them and us’ attitude is drilled into all new recruits and that he could see the young ones falling for it. /anecdote