More taxes please, we're French, and rich.

From RTÉ, 23rd August 2011

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](Please tax us, French super-rich urge)

Zoot Alors!

Blue Horseshoe

I assume this must be the few who are left who have not fled the wealth tax. Plus are n’t these people all UMP supporters. Their extra tax should just about pay the true SNCF operating deficit. That will make a real difference.

So did Johnny Hallyday ever move back to France from where was it? Belgium?

As one paper I read recently pointed out, most countries with more egalitarian wealth distribution ended up that way because most of the rich people left the country due to penal tax rates. Hence all the Swedish billionaires who live in the UK.

Even if that were so (and I don’t believe it is) Sweden is none the worse for it.

Telegraph? Daily Mail? :angry:

Johnny is more Belgian than French in real terms in any case but apparently, last seen splitting his time between Switzerland and Los Angeles…

Why don’t you offer to cover the SNCF true deficit, it would suit your naturally magnanimous personality…

It was an academic paper. Not thinktank I may add.

I always remember Johhy complaining about how the wealth tax drove him out of France and it was big news a while ago when he said he was thinking of returning.

I’m quite happy to screw the French tax payer for 50% of the price of a TGV ticket every time I take it. Plus I’m sure the CGT would not be happy with any upset of the status quo. Anyway, how could I ever complete with the breath and depth of your magnanimity which shines through with your every post. One of the most endearing qualities of your cuddly personality.

Sarkozy Proposes New Tax Measures to Confront Debt → nytimes.com/2011/08/25/world … .html?_r=1

It occurs to me that this “request” and the same appeal from Warren Buffett is an attempt to gain control of the taxation debate.

Higher taxes are coming in those countries (as well as here). By leading the debate, those with wealth can attempt to define their own outcome. If they can publically make enough noise about the nominally large (relatively small) contributions they are prepared to or are going to make, they can gain a first mover advantage and continue to lead the debate and direct the required adjustments onto other groups, under the guise and shield of “having made their contribution, having already stood up and done their bit”. Properly structured this has the potential, as they have now acknowledged higher taxes are coming, to ensure the greatest burden of the adjustment does not fall upon them.

Just don’t expect an op-ed piece like this in a News International paper. XX