Negotiating Rent - A Pin Poll.

When negotiating a rental have you ever…

  • Agreed to pay more than the advertised rent.
  • Negotiated a lower rent.
  • Neither. I always pay the advertised rent.

0 voters

Just curious.

Have you ever paid more than the advertised rent?

Have you ever negotiated a lower rent after viewing a property?

What were the reasons…?

What about adding “have you ever lost out on a property when willing to pay the quoted rent”

@Landlord. You were pretty quick in there. And why did you agree to pay more than the advertised price? Was there that much demand?

Edit:-5000 posts and no flashing lights or celebration. :frowning: It’s a bit like the anti-climax when you watch the odometer on the car clock up 100000km and you realise that the numbers keep increasing regardless… the numbers just don’t care.

In my current place about 18 months. I’ve rented 5 different places in Dublin and never paid the advertised rent. I have missed out on places with this approach though. I would say my success rate was about 30%, that is every time I’ve moved I’ve missed out on two places first.
I’ve seen all sorts of unusual behaviour during the last few years. Landlords turning down good offers and then going vacant for 6 months, and at the same time tenants paying ridiculous prices just because they don’t have the balls/imagination to show a lowball bid.

You ring up and the agent would say, ‘Sorry, that’s gone’. That’s normal enough. Were you invited to offer more than the advertised rent?

8 rentals ever
Once paid asking
4 times moved in with friends
3 times negociated lower rent
Walked away any other time
Never ever would i consider paying more than asking

No let me clarify what I mean by missing out.I go to see a place that is available, I like it and bid c15% below asking (willing to pay 10% below). They say no deal and someone else takes it for the asking.

My experience is similar to yours on the 'paying more than advertised rent - I have never come across rental properties trading above asking and from my experience with how these deals are done I would say it was extremely rare.

For the avoidance of doubt, I voted for paying less than the advertised price :slight_smile:

I initially thought the drafting of the potential responses was biased. However I am amazed that 2 people on a pin survey admitted to paying more (again neither were me).

If you want to lower your rent this strategy works in the UK and may work in Ireland.

Ask the landlord or letting agent has the mortgagee given permission for the property to be rented.

If not then likely as not they are in breach of contract and you have them by the short and curlies; letting agents can do fuck all because they failed to check this and their contract is invalid too; permission to let the property wasnt granted therefore they cannot manage or enforce anything.

No idea how that would work except highlight you as a bit of an amateur sleeveen and destroy any relationship you have with the Landlord,who will probably tell you its none of your fucking business anyway…

+1

Well its very simple, if youre not a simpleton.

A ‘landlord’ needs permission, in writing, to rent out a property.

If he is renting it out without permission, he’s breached the terms of his mortgage.

Thus, if he cant rent it out, any other contracts based on the premise that he can are null and void.

Breaching the terms of your mortgage sounds serious to me, no?
You could lose the place for that or be asked to pay arrears at a higher rate of interest, couldnt you?

Nice and simple for you and should put the almighty shits up an awful lot of amateur landlords.

Regardless of this "permission"which I have never heard of,99.99% of landlords amateur or not will,I repeat,tell you “its none of your fucking business.”

Then tell them, ‘If you dont have permission youre in breach of your contract, whether you rent it to me or not’.

Besides, if you (as a tenant) are renting a property that has no right to be rented out, all of your insurance could be invalidated.
Imagine that? Contents insurance. Personal injury. Possibly even car insurance. Whose business is it now?

I know, I know, a rented property means you’ll pay a higher interest rate, possibly arrears too.
You could also be liable for any tax breaks youve claimed (mortgage interest relief?) over the period.
Better just to settle with the tenant, no?

Can you not engage in discussion without resorting to insults?

That is just not true.

No I’m sorry it most likely is true.

You cannot take out insurance on something that doesnt belong to you.
I, for example, cannot take out insurance on your house or your car.

It follows then that I cannot take out insurance on an item where the contract is not valid.

Bit rich Knuttell as you started the insulting

Just got keys for 1 year lease to rent a 3 bed house in Blackrock for 1200 per month.
6 year ago me and Mrs Utopianmule were paying 1200 for a 1 Bed apt in Blackrock!

If Joan Burton cuts rent allowance by 40%: What impact do pinsters think this will have on rent negotiations?

It looks like the vultures are circling her department already. Was listening to her on Newstalk last week. Interesting to hear her begin the defence of her funding in early summer when she refered to social welfare payments as the “stimulus” that is helping to keep the economy afloat.

rent allowance has a big effect in some areas but much less in others. Lots of landlords for properties in “prime” areas state in their ads that they do accept rent allowance. Am currently paying €1350 for a 2-bed house in Dublin 4 with off street parking and garden. Have seen ads for similar houses on same street asking up to €2100 / month!
Rent allowance rates from citizens.ie for Dublin are:
Single person in shared accomodation €300
Couple in shared accommodation €370
Single person €475
Couple with no children €700
Couple with 1 child or one-parent with 1 child €875
Couple with 2 children or one-parent with 2 children €925
Couple with 3 children or one-parent with 3 children €950

www.thejournal.ie/readme/column-rent-su … ices-high/
www.welfare.ie/EN/Policy/ResearchSurvey … w2011.aspx