North Docklands - On the Rise !

From todays Irish Times

One of the largest stretches of development land likely to come on the market in Dublin this year, a six-acre waterfront site at Spencer Dock in the north Dublin docklands, is expected to be of interest to Irish and overseas investors when it comes on the market today.
Joint selling agents JLL and BNP Paribas Real Estate are guiding €50 million for the land, which is likely to be used for a mixed development between PwC’s headquarters and the planned new Central Bank headquarters.
The land forms part of a larger site originally owned by CIÉ at Spencer Dock which was due to be developed by Treasury Holdings before the market collapsed and the company was wound up. Receivers Luke Charleton and David Hughes of EY have now been appointed by Nama to handle the sale.
The site has planning permission for a 169-bedroom hotel, more than 31,580sq m (340,000sq ft) of offices and 165 apartments, with further scope for additional facilities.
CIE is also set to benefit from the sale, having retained a freehold interest in ground leases at the former railway yard which extends to more than 50 acres. The State transport company is understood to be entitled to either 17.5 per cent of the sale price or a similar stake in ground leases where buildings are completed and let. Treasury had developed only 20 of the 50 acres it had a lean on in Spencer Dock by the time the market crashed.
Located within the Strategic Development Zone (SDZ), and zoned for a mixed-use development, the site will almost certainly be used for a new urban quarter adjacent to the Spencer Dock development. The land is divided in two by the red Luas line on Mayor Street Upper. The southern portion, overlooking the River Liffey, is earmarked for the commercial element. The 169-bed hotel will be located within the former London and North Western Hotel dating back to the 1800s, with an interlinking eight-storey modern extension.
In addition to the hotel, there will be two high-quality office buildings. The front block will provide almost 16,722sq m (180,000sq ft) of offices over nine floors including a penthouse with views over docklands. The second office block to be located at the rear of the hotel will have 14,864sq m (160,000sq ft) over seven floors with community and retail facilities at street level.
The northern section has planning for a six-storey multifamily development providing 165 high-quality apartments with landscaped communal areas. A breakdown shows 23 of the apartments will be one-bedroom units; there will be 117 two-bedroom homes and 25 three-bedroom units. The scheme will include parking for 90 cars and 186 bicycles. The agents say there will also be scope for additional development on the portion of the site fronting on to Mayor Street.
Luke Charleton, joint receiver with David Hughes of EY, says the site has the potential to house two large headquarters for businesses looking to locate in this area. “We expect a great deal of interest both from local and international investors.”
Des Lennon says the timing of the sale is favourable given the current shortage of new office space and apartments in Dublin. The developers who secured the site could capitalise on the strong demand from the occupier markets. Further endorsement comes from Mark Forrest of BNP, who says the scale, location and zoning of the site is an opportunity not to be missed for the redevelopment of a large mixed-use site in the docklands.

From todays Irish Times

One of the largest stretches of development land likely to come on the market in Dublin this year, a six-acre waterfront site at Spencer Dock in the north Dublin docklands, is expected to be of interest to Irish and overseas investors when it comes on the market today.
Joint selling agents JLL and BNP Paribas Real Estate are guiding €50 million for the land, which is likely to be used for a mixed development between PwC’s headquarters and the planned new Central Bank headquarters.
The land forms part of a larger site originally owned by CIÉ at Spencer Dock which was due to be developed by Treasury Holdings before the market collapsed and the company was wound up. Receivers Luke Charleton and David Hughes of EY have now been appointed by Nama to handle the sale.
The site has planning permission for a 169-bedroom hotel, more than 31,580sq m (340,000sq ft) of offices and 165 apartments, with further scope for additional facilities.
CIE is also set to benefit from the sale, having retained a freehold interest in ground leases at the former railway yard which extends to more than 50 acres. The State transport company is understood to be entitled to either 17.5 per cent of the sale price or a similar stake in ground leases where buildings are completed and let. Treasury had developed only 20 of the 50 acres it had a lean on in Spencer Dock by the time the market crashed.
Located within the Strategic Development Zone (SDZ), and zoned for a mixed-use development, the site will almost certainly be used for a new urban quarter adjacent to the Spencer Dock development. The land is divided in two by the red Luas line on Mayor Street Upper. The southern portion, overlooking the River Liffey, is earmarked for the commercial element. The 169-bed hotel will be located within the former London and North Western Hotel dating back to the 1800s, with an interlinking eight-storey modern extension.
In addition to the hotel, there will be two high-quality office buildings. The front block will provide almost 16,722sq m (180,000sq ft) of offices over nine floors including a penthouse with views over docklands. The second office block to be located at the rear of the hotel will have 14,864sq m (160,000sq ft) over seven floors with community and retail facilities at street level.
The northern section has planning for a six-storey multifamily development providing 165 high-quality apartments with landscaped communal areas. A breakdown shows 23 of the apartments will be one-bedroom units; there will be 117 two-bedroom homes and 25 three-bedroom units. The scheme will include parking for 90 cars and 186 bicycles. The agents say there will also be scope for additional development on the portion of the site fronting on to Mayor Street.
Luke Charleton, joint receiver with David Hughes of EY, says the site has the potential to house two large headquarters for businesses looking to locate in this area. “We expect a great deal of interest both from local and international investors.”
Des Lennon says the timing of the sale is favourable given the current shortage of new office space and apartments in Dublin. The developers who secured the site could capitalise on the strong demand from the occupier markets. Further endorsement comes from Mark Forrest of BNP, who says the scale, location and zoning of the site is an opportunity not to be missed for the redevelopment of a large mixed-use site in the docklands.

And these “high quality” apartments have roughly half a parking space each. Sounds great!

Yes---- thats the norm in the city centre and docklands. Car parks are mostly underground and costly to construct - hence their high cost. Just look at the monthly rental charges.

Won’t need a car unless they ever need to go anywhere that isn’t on public transport, or unless they want to stay out past their bedtime at some point (luas stops at 11:30 midweek).

I understand the intention, but it’s total nonsense - how many of those pushing these rules don’t have parking spaces for their cars?

(I don’t even have a car, but to pretend like our public transport is sufficient to remove the need for private cars is real head-in-the-sand stuff).

From todays Irish Times;

Dublin docklands site for student accommodation fetches €20m
Site beside Point Village has planning permission for 935 bed spaces in two blocks.

A new development company formed by UK and Irish investors is to proceed with the construction of a substantial residential complex for students beside the Point Village in the north Dublin docklands.
The consortium has outbid about half a dozen competitors, paying more than €20 million – more than €2 million above the guide price – for the well-located site of 2.38 acres (0.96 of a hectare) with planning permission for 935 student bed spaces.
It is located next to a Luas station and was sold by Declan McDonald of receiver PwC on behalf of Wintertide Ltd and two adjoining land owners, the National Asset Management Authority and CIÉ.

The sale comes at a time when about a dozen similar residential schemes are either under way or in the pipeline. The off-campus projects under construction include developments in Gardiner Street, Dorset Street and Blackpits which alone will provide about 1,300 bed spaces. The largest single scheme of about 2,000 spaces will be at Grangegorman to cater for students attending the newly relocated DIT.
High-spec scheme
The high-spec scheme planned for Point Village, designed by TP Bennett Architects, who specialise in student accommodation, will include two seven-storey blocks with a mix of student clusters containing between three and eight bed spaces as well as twin and single study units.
One of the two blocks will accommodate 589 bed spaces, while the other building will have 346 bed spaces as well as 866sq m of retail floor space designed to attract interest from retailers and cafe and restaurant operators. There will also be a further 462m of floor space set aside for “enterprise and community use”.
Donal Kellegher of agents Cushman & Wakefield, who handled the sale of the site, says the planned student facility would benefit from a new street under construction between North wall Quay and Sheriff Street as well as the planned pedestrianised bridge linking North Wall Quay and the south docklands.
Dublin universities provide on-campus accommodation for only 6,000 of the 79,000 student population. The Higher Education Authority has forecast that third-level student numbers in Ireland are likely to increase from 168,000 in 2014 to 193,000 in 2018.

This influx of people living in the area should herald the opening up of bars , restaurants and shops in the surrounding area.

What jumps out most is that we’re still only building 7 stories in what should surely be the highest-rise part of the city.

At least we’re actually building though, I guess…?

Meanwhile iRES REIT are applying to build three fourteen story apartment blocks with 492 apartments in Sandyford, there are rumours that the Sentinel tower will be sold soon and this page shows all the commercial developments in train. Someone here suggested years ago that Sandyford could become Dublin’s La Defence and I think it might be happening (without the dramatic architecture sadly).

They wanted to apply to build 492 apartments, but their plans were not compliant - so DLRCC quickly declared their application invalid. Better luck next time I guess :angry:

planning gone in recently for a 17 story residential tower in clongriffin

Spotted what looked like a very high rise (for Dublin) building going up on the North docklands last night (I haven’t been over that side of the city much for the past 9 months). Is there something 15+ stories going up there, or was it just a trick of the light/distance?

Its capitaldock.ie/ at the end of the south quays.

The buildings’ service cores are nearly complete. The floors will hang off these.

See page 41 - dublindocklands.ie/files/bus … dpart5.pdf.

Note the Millenium Tower on Charlotte Quay beside Pearse Street has 18 stories.

Nothing wrong with tall buildings.

Maybe unclear from my post - I’m a massive proponent of tall buildings in the city centre. Is that 23 stories, or am I double counting some from the picture?

(And yes, that’s the one alright. In my defence, I was on a (moving) DART when I noticed it!)

ballymoregroup.com/project/d … n-landings

Very interesting and impressive development started next to the site for the new Headquarters of the Central Bank.

Latest updates from todays Irish Times.

Twelve cranes were located north of the Liffey – a rise of two or 20 per cent on last month – while this number could be set to rise rapidly as clearance work is proceeding at a number of substantial sites in the north docklands.
The first of these, the former “Tedcastles” site on North Wall Quay close to the Point Depot, is to accommodate a seven to nine-storey over-basement office development of 38,137sq m (410,503sq ft) in two linked blocks. One of these blocks will be accessed from Point Square and a new north-south street to run from North Wall Quay to Sheriff Street Upper.

Another large site, this time between the new Central Bank building and PwC offices at Spencer Dock, is also being cleared as the wraps come off restoration works on the former British Rail hotel which will front a substantial mixed-use scheme designed by architects Henry J Lyons at Spencer Place.
The listed hotel, which was last in use as offices for Irish Rail, is to be connected to a new eight-storey building to create a 168-bedroom hotel spread over 8,243sq m (88,727sq ft). Also included in this development is a nine-storey office block of 21,255sq m (228,787sq ft) and a seven-storey 15,925sq m (171,415sq ft) building with office, retail and community uses.
Next door to the former British Rail hotel is the North Wall Quay railway station which is included in plans for Dart Underground. The first of two new pedestrian areas planned to cross the Liffey is to be built in front of the station.
Both the British Railway Hotel and the North Wall railway station were significant departure points for emigrants and Irish volunteers bound for the trenches in the first World War. They were, in fact, the last buildings many set foot in on Irish soil given that their ships left from the nearby quays.
New headquarters
Meanwhile, construction work has started on the VHI’s new headquarters behind the Abbey Theatre. Designed by architects McCauley Daye O’Connell, part of the structure will be over the former Scots Presbyterian church hall on Abbey Street in Dublin 1.

Notable by its absence - any residential building at all (unless I’ve misread - still working on my first coffee…).

There are apartments included in the Dublin Landings and extension to Spencer Dock Developments , in addition there are 2 blocks of Student Accommodation due for completion in 2018 next to the Gibson Hotel. This is a good mix given that the area is very much a part of Dublin’s C.B.D.

More for today’s Irish Times

Dublin Port plans to ‘reorder area’ to open up to city
Aim is to ‘soften hard edge’ between Port Centre and still-developing north Docklands.

Dublin Port, for long a nearly enclosed semi-industrial estate at the eastern end of Docklands, is planning to open up to the city with an imaginative scheme to reorder the entire area around its own headquarters off East Wall Road.
Project manager Jim Kelleher, who was responsible for the outstanding Diving Bell restoration on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay, says the aim is to “soften the hard edge” between Port Centre and the still-developing north Docklands area.
Port Centre, designed by Scott Tallon Walker and completed in 1981, has been marooned behind a stone wall that extends all along the east side of the heavily trafficked East Wall Road, which is extremely hostile to pedestrians.
Standing six storeys high on a podium, the new building replaced the port’s old headquarters at the Ballast Office, on the corner of Aston Quay and Westmoreland Street, which in turn was demolished and replaced by a half-hearted “replica”.

An architectural competition in 2014 led to Darmody Architects winning the commission to create a significant public space around Port Centre, including removal of parts of the unlisted stone boundary wall dating from the 1880s.
Principal architect Tim Darmody says his scheme is “all about port-city integration”, with an impressive set of gates on East Wall Road leading to a plaza in front of the port company’s headquarters and a landscaped “garden” to the south of it.
A new boundary made from pre-rusted Corten steel panels will replace the late 19th-century stone wall at southern end of the two-acre site, with a relocated 10-tonne Stothert & Pitt crane, dating from the 1950s, rearing up above the new wall.
This dramatic installation will be “painted, illuminated, celebrated”, as Jim Kelleher says, as a totem for Dublin Port and its history, clearly visible to motorists driving north across the East Link Bridge towards the Port Tunnel and M50 motorway.
Separately, Dublin City Council is planning to remove the roundabout on the north side of the bridge, replacing it with a set of traffic lights, and “reorder” East Wall Road to make it less intimidating and more attractive to pedestrians and cyclists.
The €5.3 million scheme to open up Dublin Port to the city, scheduled for completion next autumn, will tie in with plans to relocate visiting cruise liners from the nether end of its vast estate to a pair of new berths just east of the bridge.
Dublin Port Company is also planning a 3km “great green line” – in the words of its dynamic chief executive, Eamon O’Reilly – along the northern fringe of the port, providing a new recreational route for cyclists and pedestrians to discover. It would, in effect, form an extension to the “S2S” (Sutton to Sandycove) cycle route, which is taking years to implement. The port company also has plans for a pedestrian and cycle overbridge at Promenade Road, leading into the port area.

its almost 2017 and long past the time to move on and deal with the todays Dublin

Yet another derelict site about to be transformed. Planning Permission lodged to demolish the disused Hales Freight Warehouse which occupies the site at 86 - 88 North Wall Quay and extends out to Mayor St Upper . There is going to be a lot of building work in the area for the next while.

David Carson of Deloitte, Statutory Receiver of Crossman Properties Limited (In Receivership), intend to apply for planning permission for development at this site. The development consists of the demolition of the former Hales Freight building with a total GFA of approximately 1,846 sq.m and all associated and ancillary site development works. The development does not include sub surface demolition. The application relates to a proposed development within a Strategic Development Zone Planning Scheme area.

The sale was reported in the Sunday Busines Post a few months back:

Tiny sliver of Dublin docklands sells for over €100 million per acre
86-88 North Wall Quay Pic: DublinDocklands.ie86-88 North Wall Quay
Former Hales Freight site bought for a price of some €26 million

A small strip of Dublin docklands land has been sold for an historically high price of more than €100 million per acre, according to sources in the property sector.

The quarter-acre former Hales Freight site at 86-88 North Wall Quay in Dublin has been acquired for a price of some €26 million, the sources said.