Oil and Gas fields off the Irish Coast


#321

EPA admits to doing the wrong thing!

Who’d have thunk it?

Wonder if there was any pressure on anyone?


#322

Most countries want their O&G to be produced. What a great ad Corrib is for Irish exploration.


#323

At what cost? We have an Environmental Protection Agency for a good reason.

And why would anyone want our Oil and Gas to be ‘produced’/taken? It’s not as if we stand to benefit from it in any meaningful way.


#324

Seems to be technical/procedural. Presumably they just have to redo the paperwork and dot the 'i’s this time.


#325

Surety of supply. Reduction in reliance on exports. The tax of 2B odd over it’s life. The rip off prices being paid to locals in Mayo.

That sort of stuff.


#326

Well, it’s not the taxpayer stumping up for a nine year over run on a major exploration and extraction project either!
What would be the over run if it were a state enterprise ,run by a quango of our finest politically appointed minds, supposed to bring us ‘meaningful’ benefit I wonder?


#327

Well No. Not that actually.

The board decided, in its esteemed wisdom that it was in its rights to retrospectively carry out the environmental impact assessment, AFTER granting the licence.

As I know and others have shown, there’s one rule of procedure for a certain group of people with appropriate influence (those group referred to often as “The Great and The Good”, etc.) and another method for the normal populace.

In this case, it took an expensive legal challenge to set the matter right. Only on legal review did the EPA eventually admit their wrongdoing.

This is the problem with the various public bodies oversight boards who are essentially political and insider placements in positions where they are out for no good other than for themselves and their own interests.

This country, like most others, is full of bad practice in public office.

This EPA case is a plain example.

A deliberate, chosen attempt was made by the EPA to grant the licence and try to then do the environmental impact assessment after the fact.
Not just a minor procedural/technical issue. :angry:


#328

But now they just need to grant the license again, since the statement is already done. So just a technical hurdle rather than anything that will actually delay Shell.


#329

OK. I see where you are coming from, I think?

It depends you see what will happen in the end.

If the EIS is carried out properly and fairly then there may well be things that they need to do there that actually mean that Shell et al. will be delayed, or Not, I don’t really know. That’s up to the Assessors first and then of course the Board will rule (and I think that we already have a sense of how the Board is going to rule in this case…)

But the deal is that in this case the Board of the EPA did not initially make a procedural/technical error. No. They deliberately chose to grant the licence without firstly having carried out the EIS.


#330

irishtimes.com/business/sect … -1.1648739


#331

What is the very best cost estimate per barrel of our offshore oil and how would it compete with 20 dollars a barrel?

telegraph.co.uk/finance/oilprices/12006554/Goldman-eyes-20-oil-as-glut-overwhelms-storage-sites.html


#332

a timely blast from the past :laughing: :laughing: :laughing:

politico.ie/archive/tony-oreilly … a-millions

I think this would have been originally published in Village Magazine?


#333

Bahambag! :open_mouth:


#334

While Providence still holds the license to drill Barryroe for the time being (but has no money to do it with), Tony O’Reilly divested himself of his shares while being pursued by AIB a few months ago. With no prospect of a necessary well bore and flow test being done on Barryroe in the near future, and commercial production at least several years away if ever, there doesn’t seem much chance of a tie in with anyone trying to save the Whitegate refinery. Nevertheless, in spite of agreeing that refining is strategic to Ireland’s energy security, minister Alex White doesn’t seem to have spotted that as a problem in this reply to an investor on the LSE. He also sees that all exploration risk should be borne by the private sector, something never mentioned by those clamouring for the government to increase the public revenue share.


#335

O’Briened


#336

Irish gas for Irish cookers! Bring it on!

con-telegraph.ie/news/roundup/articles/2015/12/30/4111895-corrib-gas-to-start-flowing-today—20-years-after-project-began/


#337

About bloody time.


#338

Jail the Rossport Five!


#339

So are we expecting prices for gas to drop in Ireland with this new supply?


#340

Prices for Gas are set on the International market and in accordance with local agreed market arrangements.