Paschal Donohue - endangered species. Leo - in trouble. The coming Non Binary Neo Liberal Party


#1

Dublin’s north inner city has emerged as a particular area of concern as it has been beset with major security and social, or “wicked”, issues. Scientific and research literature defines a “wicked” criminal and social dynamic as one that is complex and deep-rooted. It is often resistant to intervention efforts.

You can bet your house that migration will not be stopped.

Paschal only gets 13% of the first preference vote - it’s difficult to see how he can be reelected in the context of all the “wicked” behaviour.


#2

More sociologists, community workers and “activists” looking for human subjects to put their worthless degrees into practice is the last thing the area needs. On Buckingham St, Sean McDermott St and Summerhill every second building is some kind of amenity staffed by deluded middle-class ideologues convinced they’re making a difference, but in reality are just adding to the structure of anaesthesia and marginalisation. Fwiw, on a day to day basis it’s actually far less dangerous than say the late 80s, but when violence flares up it’s a lot more extreme-a pattern you usually see in the developing world. That’s not a reference to immigration so much as it’s a symptom of the hopelessness of being on the fringes of a hyper-capitalist machine.


#3

Where’s the tik tok dance. If there’s no dance on tiky toky tappy tappy no one cares. Thems the New Rules.


#4

The self immolation of Fine Gael continues apace


#5

Are Gardai “losing control” of Dublin’s inner city? | Gript

The problem, of course, is that in the long term, when there’s a vacuum of authority in an area, new, extra-judicial authorities spring up. Take away effective policing, and you end up with a usually brutal form of community policing. When the RUC lost the trust of the nationalist community in Northern Ireland, for example, the IRA stepped in, and drug dealers (as well as many innocents) found that instead of arrest and prosecution, they ended up being kneecapped. As for Dublin today? Well if you’re being pushed around by a gang, and not protected by the authorities, the only rational course, sometimes, is to form your own gang.

A state that loses control of a community like this will face decades of struggle to win that community back. And a lack of law and order doesn’t just mean a lack of law and order; It ultimately means that those who can afford to flee those communities will do so, leaving only the poorest, who cannot escape, behind. When the rule of law breaks down, so does prosperity, and opportunity. Four decades after Tony Gregory’s inner city renewal, we’re looking, in real time, at inner city destruction.


#6

Why would migration need to be stopped? Irish families are shrinking, we need migrant workers here. Net inward migration peaked at 34,000 in 2018, falling to 33,700 in 2019 and to 28,900 in 2020 - you think Ireland cannot handle that? Or is it just migration of a certain cohort you don’t want, like a lot of people.

Also a very crude comment from @TheRube - did some community worker break your heart? No efforts should be made to provide services to inner city struggling kids and families, is it?


#7

Migration needs to be highly selective. 60% of African migrants here are economically inactive. When you break that down by region of origin it climbs as high as 80% for Somalians. Can map the same pattern across the EU.

Why does Ireland need to add a tax burden? Why would we adopt failed migration strategies?

Golden Visa/skilled migration: Yes.

Welfare/marginal labour class: No


#8

Will you go away with your logic and facts. Logic and facts are no friends of diversity and we all need more diversity. Much more, particularly in SCD, they need it the most. :ninja:


#9

Why would migration need to be stopped?

Broad unemployment rates of up to 40/50%

Ireland - Real unemployment rate at 53% - 2020 - Thepropertypin

Irish families are shrinking, we need migrant workers here. Net inward migration peaked at 34,000 in 2018, falling to 33,700 in 2019 and to 28,900 in 2020 - you think Ireland cannot handle that?

And yet all the talk is of a massive housing shortage and insatiable demand. Who or what is driving this demand? It’s not the Irish they can’t have children at replacement rate, the migrants are barely a trickle at all. Who could it be? It’s the darndest thing


#10

North inner city was Hutch territory.

Wouldnt surprise me if the slaughter of the past few years has created a vaccum of sorts.


#11

No I don’t want net 28,900 people coming during a Pandemic when there’s mass unemployment.

Given its housing crisis and the fact the economy is clearly being prioritised over social stability, I don’t want net 33,700 in 2019 either.

I could live with about 1,000 total new wealthy Arabs and Africans attending RCSI etc each year. Anything else is wrong, destabilizing and ultimately a cruel imposition on the people.


#12

That’s Racist common sense. Racist. :wink:


#13

Not sure if you’re trolling but…

Would it not make sense to 1st ask why are Irish families shrinking?

Why would migration need to be stopped?

I don’t think any sensible person would suggest that we should stop all migration.

It’s reasonable, for the overall economic self interest of a country to limit the kinds of immigration that a country is willing to accept.

There are also issues of sovereignty and cultural considerations that should also have been discussed openly in the public forum.

Unfortunately these public discussions were not allowed to occur, and no referendum was ever put to the people of Ireland as to the character of their immigration policies.


#14

Would it not make sense to 1st ask why are Irish families shrinking? - Pretty much the same across most 1st world countries - starting families later etc. Not many having kids before 28 at the earliest anymore.

I don’t think any sensible person would suggest that we should stop all migration - that’s not what it appears the others are saying here. Let a few doctors in to RSCI but otherwise, Ireland is for the Irish - we don’t need your cleaners and waiters and childcare workers thanks. Hon the lads! But of course that doesn’t mean we can’t send half our young to other countries every generation though (legally or otherwise), that’s actually OK.


#15

People don’t have the economic or housing security… plus teens and twenties have been conditioned to take their time, enjoy their freedom, and that everything will automagically fall into place if/when they decide to find a partner and have kids in their thirties.


#16

We’re still not getting to the why?. (The actual cause.)

I don’t think it’s a sign of a healthy society to be bringing in en mass from abroad workers for jobs such as cleaners, waiters and childcare workers. That IMO, is a symptom of a sick society.
(Especially when you consider our ever expanding €200Bn national debt. Something is seriously wrong.)


#17

I think that. I’m sensible.


#18

You think we should stop all migration?
Explain yourself then.


#19

I already have. Its wrong and bad - destabilizing and a cruel imposition on the people, being pushed by those who’ll crow all day long about the benefits, ignore the costs and when the inevitable instability arises will cry for 'investment" and spout “critical race theory” gibberish.


#20

So, what if for example someone here in Ireland wishes to marry someone from abroad?