Prison Reoffending (Recidivism) Stats


#22

My example above is not mandatory sentencing.
The purpose of sentencing is not merely rehabilitation- there is usually an acknowledgment of about 5 different principles for sentencing.
Criminality tends to be a male pursuit especially for males from teens to 35/40.
The idea with a an escalation is a recognition that rehabilitation is not/had not worked and that the principle that should now become relatively more important is protection of the society at large. That is achieved by keeping convicts detained for longer terms during this window of teeens to 35/40.


#24

I didn’t mention ‘rehabilitation’; my point was that mandatory sentencing (or escalation) are unlikely to have much effect as a ‘deterrent’, another reason for imprisonment. Realistically, if you’ve racked up 99 convictions you’re (a) not very good at being a criminal and (b) committing mostly non-violent crimes. If I recall correctly, some 3 strikes legislation in the US set a minimum standard for the gravity of the crime to avoid locking up people for stealing 3 creme eggs. Escalating sentences or minimum sentences need to be well-construed and nuanced if they’re going to be useful. “X strikes and you’re out” has an appealing simplicity and makes a good soundbite, but if your aim is to reduce violent crime, the system will be more complex (e.g. An assault conviction that follows two property crime convictions is treated less severely than a third assault conviction).


#26

So, you steal 41k from a 92yo in their own home, repay 10k and thus all you get is a 2yr suspended sentence
independent.ie/irish-news/co … 24124.html

Crime continues to pay for certain sections of Irish society at the expense of the real vulnerable


#27

Some brave Gardai put it on the line to catch some of the gang who’ve allegedly being using high powered cars while carry out robberies down the country
herald.ie/news/bmw-gang-held … 55520.html
Two brave garda officers managed to arrest four members of the notorious BMW burglary gang moments after the criminals’ high-powered car crashed head-on into their patrol car.
The injured gardai - a man and a woman based at Portlaoise Garda Station - were recovering last night after the dramatic incident on the Mountrath Road outside Portlaoise at around 3pm.
The four criminals, who senior sources say have around 200 previous criminal convictions between them, were being questioned at the local garda station last night.
They are all suspected members of a notorious Traveller burglary gang based in the Tallaght and Rathfarnham areas of the capital who have used high-powered cars to travel from their Dublin base to commit burglaries nationwide.
Gardai believe that the criminals were on their way back to Dublin following burglaries in Cork city and Ballyporeen, Co Tipperary, earlier yesterday.


#28

Three jailed for vicious attack on tourists who tried to stop robbery in Dublin

rte.ie/news/2014/0729/633793 … ts-attack/


#29

independent.ie/irish-news/ne … 64994.html

This charming fellow will never recidivise(is that a word) again!

Google history for him is considerable.


#31

Not glee. Statement of fact. Search for Carlow and his name in Google. I’d say he was a one man crime wave except that his sibling appears to be as bad as him.


#32

Having listened to a report on Newstalk this morning about the problems of heroin in Roscrea I think it’s time to consider more drastic, emergency powers when it comes to chronic drug addiction. Removing these crime timebombs from society would reap huge benefits:

independent.ie/irish-news/ne … 67981.html
AN ELDERLY woman and her disabled daughter were tied up in the bedroom of their home by three raiders who escaped with over €10,000 of their savings.
Gardai are following a definite line of inquiry in relation to the robbery. It is believed the three raiders were targetting cash and valuables to pay for drugs. The chief suspect in relation to the robbery is a chronic heroin addict.


#34

you should dig a little deeper

our policy is not failed its working just as it should

heroin addiction is NOT a disease, and it would be easy to have drug free prisons, most drug treatment programs are little more than a scam

we have a large class of people making a very nice living out of our drug addicts, these people have no interest in fixing the problem, and I’m not talking about drug dealers


#35

Please, for the sake of the whole, can you outline more broadly the less obvious parties you seem to allude to without naming names. That may enjoy financial benefits from a scenario where by the human condition gets to a point that is dehumanizing for all os us because it remains continually unsolved with new participants in good supply. I’m thinking of the human suffering industry complex. It seems to have a budget of trillions. I could suggest a few names but I’m not sure I could stop there.


#36

Even treatment centres themselves will tell you their success rate is less than stellar, as in less than 30% stay clean


#37

the legal industry, every time a junkie goes to court he gets “free” legal aid

the people who dole out methadone, methadone may well be a worse drug than heroin

drugs counsellor and social workers

there are a very large number of people making a very nice living from our junkie population, I don’t think any of them really want to solve the problem, every now and then our junkie problem and how to solve it, gets debated on television or radio, its always interesting to hear the usual myths and lies being pushed, and the biggest lie is that its hard to kick heroin addiction, total bullshit

spectator.co.uk/features/3212846/withdrawal-from-heroin-is-a-trivial-matter/


#38

You will never have drug free prisons, not in this country anyway. The only way to achieve this is to ban any form of human contact with prisoners - and the many, many organisations out there who act on Prisoners behalves will never allow that to happen.

I recall some years ago, the Management in Mountjoy prison attempted to put up screens in the visiting area - as soon as word got around there was almost a riot, they backed down and I am not sure if the screens ever went up.

Even in the prisons where there are screens, they get “special” family visits to spend time with their loved ones - without the screens.

If staff manage to stop known drug mules from coming in, then you can be sure that some poor sucker, a weaker person will be beaten to within an inch of his life and forced to get his visitors to try and bring them in or when he goes to court.

It wouldn’t even matter if you did have drug free prisons, the problem is when the offenders are released, they return to the same house, in the same area, to the same people and the same life. Very few remain drug free, they go back on the dole, who’s going to employ an ex con?

In Prison they don’t get access to “more” drugs, it’s almost like saying it’s a free for all - it is not. The clampdown on drugs due to security changes has made them more precious than what they were on the outside - and we all know the lengths drug addicts go to for their “fixes”.

For me personally, the notion that Prisons should be responsible for “rehabilitating” drug addicts is ridiculous, you cannot “force” rehabilitation on people after taking away their liberty.


#40

There is treatment.

irishprisons.ie/index.php/se … soners/113


#41

Mantissa = Matthew Perry


#42

Welcome to Ireland…we do things differently here
irishexaminer.com/breakingne … 37748.html

Matt Cooper covered this on the radio earlier. None of the 3 have ever spent a day in court despite been before the juvenile courts on many occassions- 1 of them has 69 previous convictions.
Fr Peter McVerry was on saying how great the juvenile courts system is and that many kids like these are products of the environment in which they grow up! I’m sure the unfortunate Americans will be at ease hearing that.

Also well done to the taxi drivers along the quays who locked their doors to stop the brothers getting in while they were fleeing…sick fucking country


#43

ah don’t be too harsh on them

they might have a disease


#44

Dent and Fish. Reminder that Dublin was a shithole garrison town.


#47

but thats what we do now

junkies might sometimes go to prison for theft, but there is no law against being a junkie

its just another lifestyle choice


#49

Done it yourself, have you?

There’s a difference between detoxifying - which Dalrymple blusters is ‘trivial’, though I very much doubt he’s done it himself - and kicking an addiction.