Prison Reoffending (Recidivism) Stats


#455

Probation Recidivism 2011 and 2012 Cohorts

https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-pr/probationrecidivism2011and2012cohorts/

The rate of recidivism for the 2012 cohort of Probation Service users was 46.9%. The corresponding figure for the 2011 cohort is 46.8%.


#456

648 convictions!!!


#457

https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-prir/prisonrecidivism2011and2012cohorts/

Prison Recidivism 2011 and 2012 Cohorts

The rate of recidivism for prisoners released during 2012 was 45.8%.
The recidivism rate for prisoners released in 2011 was 48.9%.


#458

https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-prs/probationreoffendingstatistics20132014and2015cohorts/

Probation Reoffending Statistics 2013, 2014 and 2015 Cohorts

  • Around 3 in 10 offenders managed by the Probation Service re-offend within one-year and 4 in 10 re-offend within two years.
  • In the most recent cohort for which a three-year reoffending rate is available, 2013, 45.3% of individuals committed at least one additional crime for which they received a conviction.

#459

https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-pros/prisonre-offendingstatistics2011-2017/

Prison Re-offending Statistics 2011 - 2017

55.2% of prisoners released in 2014 re-offended within 3 years of release, a marked decrease on re-offending levels of 63.8% for prisoners released in 2011


#460

Offenders 2016 - Employment, Education and Other Outcomes 2016 - 2019

https://www.cso.ie/en/csolatestnews/presspages/2020/offenders2016-employmenteducationandotheroutcomes2016-2019/

  • The highest level of education for more than half (57.0%) of offenders up to May 2019 was the Junior Certificate or less

#461

In 2017, Freeman, who had more than 60 convictions, was described by a judge as a “menace to society” while being jailed for his role in an aggravated burglary of a 77-year-old woman at her home in Co Wicklow.

Masked men threatened her and robbed her wedding ring at 2am, leaving the woman was so terrified that she never returned to her home.

I’m glad this asshole got what he deserved in the end, but why do we let people like him continue in his chosen lifestyle


#462

If they hadn’t wiped themselves out, I get no sense that these guys were going to be taken out of circulation any time soon.


#463

Interesting that they were burnt alive though

Because it almost happened to Karl Freeman’s brother, Dean.


#464

Taylor had been given a 40-year driving ban. In all, he had 120 convictions, including 11 for dangerous driving. In court in March 2019, his barrister pleaded leniency, saying Taylor “recognised that it was time to change his life”.


#465

There’s a suspicious lack of detail about this knifing in the neck attack (beheading? or “kitchen knife”?) Mac Uilliam Road is a sociological experiment where SDCC place Travellers and Africans side by side. You’d have to think there’s at least one minority involved in this one.


#466

Well…it looks like you’re correct in your assumption. It appears the deceased is of African origin. No mention of the nationality of the suspect who was arrested in Dundalk:

From the Irish Times:

The deceased was named locally as Ademola Giwa, a fitness coach and personal trainer.

A man in his 50s was also injured in the row, which happened at around 7.15pm, and was taken to hospital for treatment.

The chief suspect for the stabbing, a man in his 20s, had fled the scene when gardaí arrived minutes after the attack.


#467

From the Independent

It is understood Mr Giwa was being investigated as part of a garda investigation into money laundering and the recruitment of money mules by a locally based criminal organisation, but he had not yet been questioned.
“Gardaí were looking at recent information they had received in relation to this, but investigations were at a very early stage,” a source said.
A former football manager who worked with Mr Giwa described him as an “absolute gentleman” who was “big into his fitness”.

“He had stopped playing football but we were still in contact on Instagram.
“He was an absolute gentleman, to be honest, and I never heard a bad word said about him.
“I know a lot of people from the Tallaght area, and he wasn’t mixed up with any gangs or anything.
“He was just a really nice guy.”

Absolute Gentleman/Suspected Money Launder
Was Mixed Up with a Gang per Gardai/Wasn’t per ex football manager.

How much does your ex football manager who follows you on Instagram really know about you ?
It’s the Law of Pamela Izevbekhai in action again


#468

Silence now makes sense. All knew from the start this was a Gorm on Gorm crime.

A MAN has been remanded in custody after he was charged with murder following the fatal stabbing of Ademola Giwa in Tallaght, Dublin on Tuesday.
John Titiloye, 26, who replied “not guilty” when charged, appeared at Dublin District Court this morning

=> Archived link
https://archive.is/VOOcJ


#469

We need Hazel Chu to get on the phone to Sadiq Khan and ask him how London deals with knife crime

The Irish franchise of BLM have been very quiet


#470

He has 36 previous convictions and is currently serving a sentence of two years with the final six months suspended for an offence of violent disorder.

36 convictions at 19 is some solid numbers, this is a man who will do serious damage in the years ahead, and at the same time generate plenty of money for the legal industry


#471

Yep, he will be a serious earner for the industry so long as some rogue judge doesn’t go daft and lock him away.


#472

https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-prs/probationre-offendingstatistics2017/

Probation Re-offending Statistics 2017

Just under one third of individuals who received a probation order in 2017 re-offended within one year, down from 36% in 2008
  • Individuals that served probation orders for offences relating to public order and other social codes (38%) had the highest likelihood of being convicted in court for re-offences within a year
  • Younger individuals issued with probation orders continue to have a much stronger tendency to re-offend with 42% of under 18’s linked to re-offending incidents compared to just 8% of over 65’s
  • Almost half (49%) of individuals placed on probation in 2015 committed at least one re-offence within three years for which they received a court conviction