Pubs going bust


#608

Is there any proof that raising the price of a drug reduces it’s consumption. I know that raising the price of smokes has, but that was an across the board raise and all brands were raised. It also increased cigarette smuggling, my mother can buy a pack of smokes in her local for half the retail price from an old dear in the corner.
This rise will affect only those on lower incomes as it raises the base price, middle class and upper class Alcos will be unaffected by any of this.


#609

I just ran the tax calculations on this for my own amusement. The Euro price difference between Ireland and the UK is €1.56 per bottle. Of that the Irish government takes €1.32 and the remaining €0.24 goes to the retailer/distributor/manufacturer.

image.ibb.co/m91qSm/cider.jpg


#610

I buy the budget cider for marinating pork and ham and budget beer to use as an ingredient in chili con carne. So I’ll get hit if/when this comes in, but not hugely.

Unless, as has already been pointed out above, everything else increases price in lockstep.


#611

I do a pork and cider stew on occasion but have generally shied away from the really cheap stuff. perception as much as anything I suppose

I guess if you are a retailer you want to steer a certain cohort (who are used to drinking low-quality booze) towards your highest margin product i.e. the low quality stuff, therefore, the stuff just around the min price has to go up


#612

I don’t know about it reducing consumption, but for serious addicts, they’ll find the money somewhere!
Result is more poverty in the drinkers family or increased crime as the money has to be found.


#613

That’d be my feeling on it too. Alchoholism a lot of the time is a symptom of other problems, a price increase does nothing to address those problems. It’ll also mean a different cost benefit analysis, it may push alcoholics into stronger drinks that give better ALC% to € benefits.


#614

Evidence for the benefits of minimum pricing. ias.org.uk/uploads/pdf/News%20stories/iasreport-thomas-stockwell-april2013.pdf


#615

Anyone know what is replacing this pub?


#616

Is that Berminghams pub? It was a real throwback to an older time. Great place for a quiet pint.


#617

Given the applicant, I’m thinking a clinic of some sort.
Lots of hookers around there (so Mantissa reliably informs me), so an STD clinic wouldn’t go amiss.


#618

The brothel that operated above the hardware shop near there is gone, or so a friend tells me :nin :angry: so maybe not as much demand.


#619

i recall locals wanting to stage an anti-prostitution protest before a match/gig in Croker last year.


#620

I didn’t know that. I wonder where it’s based out of now.


#621

Asking for a friend? 8- 8- and all that :angry:


#622

In case a weary traveller were to enquire. :angry:


#623

The Long Stone pub had it before Christmas, after 264 years

The Wright Venue in Swords is to close in a few weeks. Club 92 in Leopardstown went at New Years. Amazing a city the size of Dublin, with a young enough population can barely support a nightclub. They seem to have fallen out of favour only in the last 5 years really.

newstalk.com/Dublins-Wright-Venue-to-close-down-later-this-month


#624

The Wright venue is no loss but I’ve been in the Long Stone many a time sad to see it go.


#625

Yeah but its not gone bust, it was sold for development

its a pity to see old pubs being knocked down but on the upside we also lose the Department of Health building, a building so ugly it makes me sick


#626

demographics dictates we dont need as many pubs as we had from 1997 to 2005. I find it interesting that Una Mulally bemoans the diminishing dublin nightlife scene, but there arent as many 20-30 year olds around as there used to be 15 years ago


#627

The Long Stone is not 200 years old - it was built in the 90s. There was a pub there before, but it was a different building and it wasn’t called the Long Stone.