Ref, EXIT POLL - How did you vote?


#21

…but, but, but… sher Enda hasn’t had a personal journey re what the majority of the people in this country wants/needs… and as for the Labour party putting that kind of sense into their party manifestos/negotiations for programme for government… sher where would you get that idea from?!?


#22

If even .001% of our population are not treated equally in the constitution we have a duty to do something about that.
Media were incredibly strict with time allotments, you may not have heard all the no campaigners but from my perspective there was a good balance. The majority of elected representatives and many respected public figures were campaigning for a yes vote, there weren’t as many big names supporting no which might give the impression that they were underrepresented but I think in actual air time terms there was equal coverage


#23

Homosexuals were treated very badly by Irish society for a long time. I’m happy to see such strong support for a Yes vote.

Edit: Here’s one I remember although I was young at the time:
comeheretome.com/2013/06/03/reac … n-ireland/
9 September 1983: Declan Flynn, Fairview Park, Dublin
Flynn (31), an Aer Rianta worker, was beaten to death by a group of five teenagers in a ‘gay-bashing’ incident in Fairview Park. The gang had been responsible for a spate of attacks on gay men in previous weeks and it emerged that they used the park to target members of the gay community. As Flynn lay dying, £4 from his pocket and his watch was stolen. In court, one of the teenagers admitted that “we were all part of the team to get rid of the queers from Fairview Park”. The five male teenagers were all released on a suspended manslaughter charge with Judge Sean Gannon saying “This could never be regarded as murder”.


#24

Not true.

Ive read today that an independent surveyor has calculated that Yes articles outnumbered No articles in newspapers by three to one…when you factor in web forums and social media, this has probably been the most one-sided referendum ‘debate’ in the history of the Irish State…


#25

A majority of Pinsters in favour of lowering the Presidential candidate age? I’m surprised by that, but I had a ‘road to Damascus’ conversion myself.


#26

You don’t remember the tiny feet on collar pins I guess.


#27

+2 the pontificating and one-upmanship is quite tiresome.


#28

Your percentages are a bit off. Half of the heterosexual population is too young or too old to get married too, and plenty more are ‘playing the field or have no interest in getting married’. So, in due course, the percentage of same sex marriages is likely to be reflective of the total number of lesbian/gay people in the country.


#29

There was definitely a massive heavy bias towards Yes in all the meeja…

All these people ‘returning home’ to vote, I wonder if they were ordinarily resident here on 1st September last?
Otherwise they are not eligible to be on the electoral roll. But shure this is ireland


#30

There’s is definitely a class of people who would probably have voted to give the gay community more rights than the rest of us just to show everyone how right on and liberal the really are. :slight_smile:


#31

I think that the no side in general have a hard time accepting just how ‘one-sided’ (i.e. there is only one right answer) and important a civil rights issue this is for large swathes of the population. It’s not only ‘media luvvies’ who have friends and family-members directly and personally affected by this. Western culture has progressed fairly rapidly in recent times in its attitudes toward people who are homosexual. It is no longer denied and swept under the carpet as it once was and it is no longer socially acceptable to express the view publicly that to be homosexual implies some sort of moral failing or depravity. Even the prominent no campaigners will not admit to believing this.

For thousands of years women were also treated as second-class citizens. There are some who might privately still wish this were the case but I’m glad to live in a society where this view is recognised as abhorrent. In fact marriage, as we now understand it, being based on mutual consent and romantic love, is a fairly modern construct. I see absolutely no logical reason why same-sex couples should be barred from it. I do see very compelling reasons why they should not. I think a future where sexuality expressed between consenting adults is private and unremarkable is a bright prospect.

I genuinely do not understand the lack of empathy and bitterness towards our gay brothers and sisters, no more than I understand any bully trying to keep other people down just because of who they are.


#32

Evidence from elsewhere would suggest that gays are less interested in marriage than the heterosexual population…

nytimes.com/2013/10/27/style … .html?_r=0
“It’s a very, very archaic model,” said Sean Fader, 34, an artist in New York who is single and asked to be identified as queer. “It’s this oppressive Christian model that says ‘Pick a person that’s going to be everything to you, they have to be perfect, then get a house, and have kids, and then you’ll be happy and whole.’ ” Some of the opposition among gay men and lesbians is rooted in a feminist critique of marriage, which sees it not as a freedom to be gained but as an institution that has historically oppressed women.


#33

So what? I daresay you could do a vox-pop of straight people on the street and you’d find a decent number who don’t believe in marriage (and this is probably increasing, in all likelihood because they are rejecting the conservative version of marriage which says you must have the picket fence and 2.4 kids etc.). But evidently there are many more gay people who want the opportunity to marry. I personally know a few couples who intend to marry if this passes. And anyway, whether you marry or not, that’s not the point. The point is that you are forbidden to marry (today anyway) just because you are gay. A little empathy and placing yourself in someone else’s shoes usually goes a long way to understanding why people campaign for any civil rights. I saw an internet commenter say (sarcastically) ‘Sure what was the problem, didn’t Rosa Parks have a seat on that bus?’. I think that demonstrates the point very well.


#34

I have never met any of those people so I find it hard to believe they actually exist. On the other hand, I have met plenty of people who regard homosexuality as immoral, unnatural, sinful and disgusting. Those people aren’t imaginary.


#35

Well said. Not sure why journalists should be forced to write anti-gay rights articles just to fill a quota.


#36

Just googled ‘Exit Poll Irish Referendum’ and we were 4th on the list.


#37

And this is why people want to live in SCD

From twitter, DLR Councillor luke martin


#38

RTÉ report

22.23 The voting period for the referendums on same-sex marriage and presidential-age has ended with polling stations reporting an “unusually high” electorate turnout.

Will be interesting to see if there really was a silent no majority out there as claimed by some.


#39

I don’t think so. The Church needs to have a good think about how it is to become relevant in Ireland when it’s so far out of step with the people.


#40

Naked Fridays?