Residential Rental Arrears and Evictions


#21

Wow, what sort of family history do they have that means they have no one else to turn to?
The numbers of homeless families reported in the media must be more representative of problems with tenants being evicted rather than those in mortgage arrears, both are problems but the former appears to be more acute. Of course renters don’t count


#22

thejournal.ie/tyrrelstown-cr … 6-Mar2016/


#23

Elected representative avises tenants to break the law. Welcome to Ireland!


#24

Senator Aideen Hayden advocated the same course of action yesterday


#25

Given the massive gap between just about manageable market rents and availability of credit to buy, I’m surprised the purchasers aren’t more willing to take sitting tenants. I mean, it’s not as though they’re likely to sell the whole estate in a hurry to anybody other than another institutional purchaser.
We still have a small, albeit inflated, liquid property market, but tenants coming out of our ears. Maybe I’m a bit thick, but I’d be willing to risk a guess as to which is the larger market.

It’s all a bit odd, unless they want to hike the rent for the new tenants, hold for two years and then flip the purchase, but we’re reaching a point where the pips are starting to squeak. We have 2006 rents, but more than 2006 taxes and barely 2006 incomes. If the economics of rented Dublin residential property affordability were mad then, why are worse economics less mad now? :confused:


#26

Who said they were made then, though? Rents were still linked to affordability then, it was only the prices of properties to buy that went insane - there was ample supply of rental properties as so many people had BTLs and people were able to live around Ireland without having to be in Dublin for work. These days the country is more Dublin-centric, all graduates are flocking to Dublin after college and we have lots of wealthy foreign techies arriving with more to spend on rent than their Irish counterparts and very little supply. The key is supply, if there were thousands of new properties available, prices would surely drop.


#27

Plenty of my EU colleagues who legged it back to the mainland after a couple of years of renting hovels for the price of decent homes in their countries of origin in a city with lousy amenities and public services by their standards.

who are starting on salaries that barely allow them to subsist after rent.

I’m not seeing salaries advertised that are noticeably higher than they were ten years ago, with taxes that are higher and rents about equal, and I’m a PhD qualified engineer. The problem isn’t lack of potential tenants, but simple lack of money for them to spend. Just how many people can we hoodwink into coming over and then pissing off disillusioned a year later? Can we persuade them them that it all makes financial sense if they just commute from affordable ghost estates in Leitrim? Is this the new paradigm?


#28

In IT, while salaries may not have changed all that much, there certainly seem to be a far larger number of relatively highly paid developer roles than there used to be; a larger proportion of the IT industry used to be sales, support, localisation, etc.


#29

Anyway, it’s not really my problem at the moment, since there are no jobs in inner Dublin anyway, so I have no reason to move there and I can just as easily commute inwards as outwards. :smiley: If they all flood to the outer suburbs or the other places with employment prospects, I’ll start to worry more. :frowning:


#30

Jesus. She’s chair of Threshold right? How can she advocate an illegal stance?


#31

Because the system is broken.


#32

She had a whole section of Drivetime to herself yesterday. The presenter was shocked and said to her at 1 stage ‘are you advocating squatting’.
Hayden had did a lot of ranting about whats wrong, what needs to be done, how the Govt should intervene etc. You’d nearly swear she wasn’t a member of the Labour party that was on Govt the past 5 years :blush:


#33

Sept 28th-30th, 2008.


#34

Tyrrelstown notices: ‘This is happening all over the place’

irishtimes.com/news/social-a … -1.2574613


#35

John McManus: Property funds have become the new ‘bondholders’

irishtimes.com/opinion/john- … -1.2574214


#36

independent.ie/irish-news/we … 80754.html


#37

Christ! The Irish media, they wet themselves when Dalkey is in the name. Sensationalism at its worst. Looks like an OK apartment, hardly the height of luxury. Dalkey while
nice must be one of the most over hyped areas ever. It’s more a testament to the fact that Dublin is generally speaking pretty kippy.


#38

So … go to where your family is.


#39

Life story and dead link to crowdfunding attempt to buy the house.

oursafehaven.ie/

Quoted for posterity.


#40

Any mention of anyone getting a job in all that time ?