Russia, liberating Ukraine from the clutches of the Menace

geo-political
menace
tyran

#187

‘This is not our war, it is not our fight’ :thinking:


#188

The administration has sought to keep much of the battlefield intelligence secret, out of fear it will be seen as an escalation and provoke President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia into a wider war.

A strike over the weekend at a location in eastern Ukraine where Gen. Valery Gerasimov, Russia’s highest-ranking uniformed officer, had visited was not aided by American intelligence, according to multiple U.S. officials.

sure :+1:

Edit: next day.


#189

Of course Western intelligence is backing Ukraine up to the hilt. What did Russia expect? This is an illegal war of occupation, just like Iraq, Vietnam and Afghanistan. The only difference is that this time it’s on Europe’s doorstep and now the entire and former Warsaw Pact is backing Ukraine to the hilt. The former Soviet satellites know what’s at stake, and that is why they are most vociferously against the Russian war.

The decision for Europe is stark. It’s either protection of basic right and rule of order, or it’s banditry. I don’t say this as a banality. I remember the collapse of the Irish Republic after the property bubble, the intervention of the IMF, and how our annual budget proposal ended up on the floor of a German parliament.

It’s all still better than executions, disappearances, poisonings, and the occasional defenestration of people of high standing from even higher buildings.


#190

This is an illegal war of occupation

https://twitter.com/kamilkazani/status/1521854118842753025

Online chatter is that War will be declared perhaps within the next week.

Some Russians have suggested, possibly the 10th.


#191

Refering to Zelenskiy’s rise to fame as an actor and comedian, he added: “We should be having a serious conversation. OK, you were a nice comedian. But let us not make war for you to show up on TV.”

“Putin shouldn’t have invaded Ukraine. But it’s not just Putin who is guilty. The US and the EU are also guilty,” Lula said


#192

You’re giving some countries a little too much credit, if Poland move “peace keeping troops” into Western Ukraine, things might look a little different

Only if you can ignore the actions of the Kiev government over the last decade

I think America’s next war (Iran) could be interesting, the Russians might have a few surprises in store for them


#193

#194

Hmm…
Be top Canadian army guy. Well, about to be literally top army guy.
Resign in April (some scandal, ill-defined).
Decide to take trip to Ukraine!
To Mariopol in Ukraine.
Finds some other Canadians there too!
Get captured by Russia.
Get sent to Russia.
Now having PoW trial in Russia?
As you can imagine there are no western newspapers reporting so hard to know how much is accurate, there is mention of a lab in Mariopol in some reports…

https://twitter.com/georgemckenna99/status/1522181276194770946


#195

Kremlin slams publications about plans to announce mobilization on May 9 as nonsense

https://tass.com/politics/1446787

The above statement from a state Russian news source reads crystal clear - Russia will mobilize.

Who in Russia is going to shout stop? Who is thinking about the thousands of Russians that are going to be tossed into the meat grinder before this war is over?


#196

Responding to your points.

  1. Poland have clearly backed Ukraine in a way few others have, but will stop at the line (troops across the border). I’ve seen mercenaries all over the world in Ukraine, but I’ve yet to read of a Pole that serves there.
  2. Ukraine is one of the most unfree countries in Europe. It’s only ahead of Belarus and Russia. With regard to freedom, it’s clearly a very mediocre country. I will say, at least it’s moving in the right direction. Russia on the other hand is going down the other direction. It’s gone from being an authoritarian government, to a totalitarian regime.
  3. America have learned the hard way through Iraq and Afghanistan that regime change isn’t easy. Russia have not learned these lessons first hand, or at least have forgotten them from their foray into Afghanistan. Their attempts to Russify Ukraine will fail.

#197

I am always reminded of this interview from David Starkey (listen how everyone laughs at him at the beginning).

I may not be fancied around here, but I suggest you watch the 60 seconds of this fellow on BBC Question Time that I linked to above.

Russia is clearly learning at first hand the lessons that America had to learn in Iraq and Afghanistan in the last 20-30 years.


#198

I think you misunderstand Iraq, Iraq has been destroyed, for the Neo cons that counts as close to 100% success, talk of democracy and freedom is for the rubes. do you believe they also wanted democracy and freedom for Libya and Syria, (or Iran) if you think they care about the Ukrainians you don’t see their true motivation, very few do

All of it, yeah its far too big. We don’t really know what Putin wants, he may stop once they take Odessa, that might be enough for him to claim “victory”


#199

America does not have land borders with Iraq or Afghanistan. They were never at any stage part of the same government or state block. They don’t share a common language, culture or religion.

Russia shares all these things with the eastern provinces/oblasts of Ukraine.


#200

Above is a lot more reasoned than some of what you have posted previously and I wouldn’t disagree with all of it.

However, the following quote seems to display the standard western media led interpretation of what is taking place -

Quote
“America have learned the hard way through Iraq and Afghanistan that regime change isn’t easy. Russia have not learned these lessons first hand, or at least have forgotten them from their foray into Afghanistan. Their attempts to Russify Ukraine will fail.”
End quote

A number of assumptions contained therein-

1 - You are assuming that Russia intends to occupy Ukraine and effect regime change. It seems increasingly unlikely that their intentions extend beyond placing Russian-friendly regimes in place within the Russian speaking regions from Donbass to perhaps as far as Odessa. Nonetheless their true intentions remain unclear.

2- The neo-con invasions of Iraq, Afghanistan and the rest had as their primary motivation the absolute destruction of those societies’ physical infrastructure so as to create te opportunity for the awarding of reconstruction contracts to connected insiders post-conflict. The Russians appear to have the opposite in mind (despite what has occurred in Mariupol) ie they appear not want to have to have to assume responsibility for reconstruction costs. This is quite possibly why they have yet to launch full aerial assaults despite having complete aerial superiority (Mariupol is an exception in the destruction stakes thus far). By way of illustration, the US carpet bombed Iraq for a month prior to launching a ground assault. The Russians have not adopted a similar approach, presumably for a reason.

3- the US and their allies also sought to effect a form of cultural deconstruction (and reconstruction) in places like Afghanistan and Iraq. In Afghanistan for example, they spent billions attempting to create a woke elite that would administer a western leaning liberal hegemony by way of educational, legal, ngo streams etc, thereby creating a natural western ally in the region into the future. All these billions of American taxpayer money spent over a period of 20 odd years was ultimately seen to have been wasted within a month of the withdrawal from Kabul. The Russians have no such designs. Instead their stated intent is to preserve what already exists (in cultural terms) in places like the Donbass etc ie there will be no similar haemorrhaging of billions in promoting/imposing an alien Californian style progressive wokeism. Again, most western commentators appear not to understand this, presumably because they appear unaware of the fact that many people (probably most) actually support the Russian invasion in places such as Donbas and Lugansk.


#201

Cracks in the narrative ?

https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/turmoil-for-norman-brigade-canadian-led-foreign-battalion-in-ukraine


#202

Donbass, Luhansk, landbridge to Crimea and protecting its canal/water supply?


#203

Yes water for Crimea is clearly important, but there is also oil and gas in the region


#204

https://sonar21.com/cia-ineptitude-russian-cauldrons-and-the-ukrainian-mafia/


#205

Artillery kills/injures most soldiers on the battlefield.

American veteran, James Vasquez, fighting in Ukraine, recently published a video of getting shelled. Now it seems he’s tweeting about returning to America.

A Dutch volunteer fighter has been killed in Ukraine. It marks the 1st time a Dutch fighter was killed in this war. The man, 55-year-old Ron Vogelaar, was fighting with the Ukrainian Foreign Legion when he was hit by artillery fire near Kharkov last Wednesday.
RIP hero
https://twitter.com/TheDeadDistrict/status/1523706678394318848


#206