So whats your plan?


#1

Things are gonna get crazy next year, 17% unemployment minimum? Alot more of us using this site are going to be made redundant. Ireland is in big trouble. In all seriousness its not the end of the world but the jobs front wont be much good for several years (saw optimistic Dept of Finance figures and looking at 2013 until things are really starting to break even again).

What will you do? Do you have a contingency plan if you lose your job ?


#2

I’m going to become as Self Sufficient as possible. I will set about producing as much of my own food as I possibly can. I will Fish for Protein. I will become energy efficient and will reduce my Shopping Expeditions. Also, I will try and make my existing clothes go a lot further and longer than in the past. I will try and save money for my retirement. I will only buy useful Fruit Producing bushes and Trees. I will cease buying Ornamental Shrubs and trees. I will keep my car and make it go for 20 years if possible. Everyone should produce something, even if it is only growing herbs in pots on window cills.


#3

Have reduced debt to zero, reasonable savings tucked away, moved to a comparable rental house at 45% less than asking when previous Landlord would only drop by 18%. Am frantically working on a business idea, in parallel with doing a Masters and other supporting qualifications. Kids (under 6) are being held back from starting school and instead intensively learning French / pre-school / lots of time with family / lots of FUN / outdoors - being kids!

Hoping that business idea will be successful. If not, parallel plans are in place for family to emigrate probably to French-speaking country, early Summer 2010. Quality of life, the ability to earn fair take-home pay and not be in a noose to banks re mortgage are what’s important to us.

The reduced energy, growing veg., shopping around etc are already established habits in this house and provide great enjoyment to us.


#4

Plans in no particular order and not all thought out fully yet
I have a very transferable skill and can get work in any center of petro chem industry or most heavy industry and much of this international work is available on a rotational work basis like off shore i.e. 4 weeks on 4weeks off etc. If money is the major requirement I will do this.
Emigrate to a decent country that has the above.
Take up full time farming. I have this option either part time (I asked for advice about this in another thread) or full time but neither pay enough and I don’t fancy condemning my family to poverty.
I have a germ of an idea for a business but I don’t have the money yet. It needs time to mature.
I have access to equipment to produce crafts products for the export market but unless things get real bad here and good everywhere else this won’t produce enough money for a family in Ireland. Stupidly the economics for this would work in a couple of other countries, so emigration for this could also be an option

BTW: I do have a licensed shotgun, moderate store of non perishable food and well stocked garden for the later summer if it all goes titsup :smiling_imp:


#5

It’s difficult to make any plans because as soon as you mentally adjust to the new reality, things get worse… I’m in a reasonably lucky position of being free to emigrate with wife and children (anybody want a dog?), but we won’t. Life has been tough before and I feel we have a responsibility to work towards a better, fairer society. The most important first step is to get rid of FF from the local authorities but if the Irish people fail to take this step, then I’ll know that the time is not right for change and emigration will become a real option.

Still plenty of work, but a couple of other business ideas on stand-by.


#6

No more debt. No plans for changing car in near future.
Stopped shopping spree specially tech stuff.
Saving as much as possible for rainy days.
No holidays this year.
And thats it.


#7

On losing job:

  • spend more time in the garden (aim for vegetable self-sufficiency)
  • finally learn to program in c/c++!
  • finish the jobs around the house that are currently abandoned

Otherwise:

  • carry on as normal (watching where most euro go, not stopping spending, just watching and shopping around)
  • saving for likely school/university fees for the children
  • waiting for the scrappage scheme to be extended to second-hand cars…

#8

Been chewing over emigration for quite a while now, now it’s more or less a dead cert, just a question of timing.

If I can locate a good site for it (at a tourist attraction or shopping centre) I’m looking at buying a carousel as a means of creating my own job. Heading off in a few weeks to scout out possible locations. Best I can come up with this week!


#9

With a only a few responses on this thread, I’m already more worried than I was 5 miinutes ago. On the Pin, there are lots of what my friend calls ‘top tier’ people.
And yet the general consensus amoung most is to batton down the hatches, prepare for the worst and never look to a day when things might actually turn around. Dont get me wrong the conservativeness is well justified but dont these kind of thoughts fly in the face of any efforts to get out of the shit.
Or is it inevitable that people will think of themselves and their nearest and dearest first…and then their country. Dont worry I am not suggesting we “need to spend for the sake of the country” but I cant help thinking we are headed for much worse times due to the mindset of everyone as the government walks the country off a plank.
I wish I could disagree with the opinions as posted above but I find it hard.
Personally I think I will sit out the storm in France…with very little hope of seeing things turn aorund inside the next 5 years.


#10

Keep on renting
Keep shopping in Lidl
Save as much as possible
Try and keep job

Not much of a plan, but that’s how I roll.


#11

Emigration not an option due to sick parent. So…

Try and keep job
Keep an eye out for nixers
Keep an eye out for new business opportunities
Keep shopping in Lidl
Save when possible

Basically, continue as we have been doing for the last 10 years.


#12

Expand, Create & Hopefully enjoy life a bit more!


#13

+1

I’ve recently resigned from a permanent and pensionable job to pursue something I’ve been working at in a self-employed capacity for the last two years while on career break. It’s a precarious life but I’ve more control over what I do and what I earn than I’ve ever had before (I’ve eggs in a lot of baskets).

I’ve been in recession since I started the career break but am at the point where all I see is opportunity, self-determination and the potential to realise potential and make a massive difference in the world. I work really, really hard but there’s a pay-off in job satisfaction and finally, now, just about in income. We live simply anyway (still concrete on the sitting room floor, for example and it will be that way for a while) and will muddle through what comes, DV.

But what comes will be desperate. I don’t see the country recovering for twenty years from what’s likely to happen in the next 12-18 months. We are the victims of a heinous crime against humanity. Peoples don’t recover easily from such state-sponsored abuse.


#14

No mortage at present.

Substantial enough savings - enough for 5-7 years unemployed, IF I dont splurge on a house…

Dont waste money and keep at work as long as job lasts.

Big crux will be - will my 12 month contract be renewed this Nov?


#15

i reckon i have a year and a half of work left (two years max), then it’s pack the rucksack and off to see the world again. i’ve never been to India or south america so i’ll give it a whirl. (i will not applying for bodyguard work in Bolivia) i want to learn Spanish and italian.
you can easily have a good life there on a few grand for six months. i’ve a stack of books i’ve been wanting to read and there’s grass hut by a beach in Cambodia i’d like to see again.(but not in the rainy season)
i’d like to go back to Burma again and travel through it more, the first time was very intense.
i won’t be surprised if i didn’t come back to Ireland again.
i have a great lifestyle (largely because i rent), i save every second paycheck (inspired by the Pin).
i’d like to learn new useful and transferable skills. i want to be fitter than i am, i always felt happier when i was fit.
i’d like to learn to sail.
i want to do a really good self defense course.

ultimately i want to get back to the things i loved doing in the past, life is short.

ireland is a basket case, it’s been difficult to accept how bad things are but with perspective it’s easier to work around it. forewarned is forearmed etc…
i was on the dole for half a decade before and i didn’t have resources like the Pin by which i could begin to understand, depressingly i just accepted things then. i wasted so much time then, i will not let that happen again.


#16

Dont know what level your Spanish is at but this lot are as good as it gets when it comes to getting a grounding before immersing yourself in the Spanish speaking world…

dublin.cervantes.es/en/default.shtm

Ive been told that an award of a certificate from here would be considered to be of higher value than a degree from most Irish Universities (when outside Ireland). Have one myself of course so maybe that was the sales pitch :wink:

As for plans, no plan really other than to stay alive and play it by ear. Attempt to remain positive - even though it can be difficult at times when many around you are being slashed and burnt - and take it from there. For all our faults, there are a lot of worse places to be than little old Ireland. There are people literally dying on a daily basis in attempts to gain entry to Europe, financial crisis or not, so the retention of perspective is essential amidst the doomery


#17

thanks for the link Poacher.

i know what you’re saying about people dying in the attempt to enter Europe, i’ve seen enough of the world to know just how good we have it. i’m grateful for that.


#18

Spending will plummet regardless. Unemployment is gone mad. Those who have jobs and are fearful of losing it will naturally save and save hard to lessen the impact should the worst occur.
There is no changing of the mindset to be done at all at all. What is happening is natural in recessions and gains its own momentum. We will overshoot on the way down with regard to unemployment, the ISEQs bottom and house prices.

On a personal note, when I graduate next year and jobs are impossible to find do I:
A) Move abroad?
B) Spend potentially 5 years here unproductive on the dole?

While I know that the people who this recession affects the worst are those who are most likely to vote for change or actually lead change the fact of the matter is that most will leave. Those who stay will be those with jobs and logically its the people the recession affects the least meaning change is less likely.


#19

You are joking aren’t you?
I’m a friggin expert in C/C++ and I can’t get work in Ireland. I get above 4.8/5.0 (96%) in BrainBench C++ exam(all financials use Brainbench to weed out tyerkickers). You wouldn’t believe the study I had to put myself through to get those marks. I mean there is one thing when you are a labourer and you can’t get work. But when you study your arse off in collage and then study your arse off when working and you find yourself…


#20

Bloody Carnies :imp: