SpaceX - The Quest For Mars


#382

Musk praises her with frequency in interviews, usually stating that she handles the entirety of the business side of SpaceX, freeing him up to do what pleases him.


#383

https://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/attachment.php?attachmentid=441048&stc=1&d=1518098654


#384


#385

A great 3D soundscape from the Falcon Heavy launch – needs headphones:


#386

Look 5 posts up…


#387

SpaceX is planning an ambitious ramp up of launch cadence with 5 x Falcon 9 launches planned in April.

The last of which may demonstrate the final Block 5 version of the Falcon rocket. It will have a different paint livery (black interstate) and will incorporate all the learnings from the recovered boosters. It has extra reentry heat shielding for the engines, a special paint on the outside and the net Titanium Grid fins. The block5 is designed for rapid reuse with minimal servicing aside from refuelling for 10 launches but it should be capable of 100 reuses before scrapage. SpaceX like to tweak each launch and try new hardware etc but NASA has mandated that they make no changes to the rocket for 5 successive launches before they will certify it as human capable.

All being well we will see humans fly on this by the end of the year or early 2019.

Space is exciting again. :smiley:


#388

Looks Like the Russians had the right idea back in 1959!

youtu.be/TdSxDNnqRlo


#389

Yebbut did they ever launch a Lada on it? :smiley:


#390

I would’ve been even more impressed if they’d launched a Zil!


#392

New low-power laser tracking beacons for satellites (a.k.a. future space junk).

astrobites.org/2018/04/04/introducing_elroi/


#393

Not according to the official story. The latest version is that the satellite was lost but it was Northrop Grumman’s fault. Handy story that – no spy satellite, but no blame attaching to SpaceX.

Another one I missed in the last fortnight – the FCC has approved SpaceX’s broadband constellation.


#394

arstechnica.com/science/2018/04/russia-appears-to-have-surrendered-to-spacex-in-the-global-launch-market/?comments=1

The Russians even with a falling Rouble can’t compete with SpaceX, they really should have been nicer to Musk all those years ago

Also possible SpaceX launch for NASA tonight


#395

I don’t think you need trees for oil formation, its more algae and plankton that are important

Mars is not geologically active today but its very clear that is was in the past, Olympus Mons is the largest Volcano in the Solar system, its so large Galileo might have been able to see it, we also know that Mars had oceans and an atmosphere, so all the building blocks for oil were once present, therefore IMO its possible that Mars could have oil deposits

And thats before we start to wonder about Titan

Yes but the Methane can clearly also be burned in an engine as back up, it would be foolish to rely on just one system


#396

It’s not quite about being emperor of your own planet it is about ensuring the survival of our species and he’s doing it by getting it to pay for its self by creating a new massive off world economy.


#397

Russia famous for making fun of a young Elon Musk and his rocket plans and formerly provider of the worlds leading low cost reliable launchers is struggling for business.

arstechnica.com/science/2018/06 … -9-rocket/


#398

Can earth based organisms successfully procreate and raise healthy off-spring on a planet with 38% of the gravity of earth? What effect will the lack of Sun exposure have on Martian Humans? There has been some science done on mammal babies in space and then brought back to Earth but none on long-term off-Earth living.


#399

The short answer is probably yes.

There is a huge difference between having no gravity and having 40% gravity.

The longer answer is that they will probably adapt well to Mars but mammals born and raised on Mars would find it much harder to go back to Earth.


#400

Probably yes is a big gamble, it could also be probably no. If we can’t procreate outside of Earths gravity well then we’re not colonising Space.


#401

We can make our own gravity in space with centrifuges more easily than on the surface of Mars. Personally I don’t see the point in populating Mars. It is far less hospitable than any conceivable future Earth. In the very long run the same events threaten both Earth and Mars. And in the meantime the few singular threats to Earth such as large asteroid impacts can easily be dealt with. If we’re capable of colonising another planet we should easily be able to nudge a few space rocks out of the way.


#402

Yep spinning space stations would get over gravity but who would want to spend the rest of their lives on a spinning tube, when there is Earth with all it’s beauty.

Even if it was possible to procreate on Mars would it be right to imprison future children born there to the planet. The planet is dead and hostile to life. You’d be consigning them to a prison planet that at any moment could kill them.