Strike Season


#921

Your wife should look at getting an electric bike, the good ones are not cheap but depending on her commute it may be far better than the bus


#922

Whatever about the merits or otherwise of strike action one of the main causes of unpredictability in Dublin Bus timetables is the lack of bus lanes and the lack of policing of the ones that do exist. This also leads to issues in the turnaround time of buses in the morning. A bus travelling into Dublin City Centre in the morning will be very lucky to get out in time to reservice that route before the rush hour is over. It might be timetabled for two trips but it won’t make it.

There are a number of ‘pinch points’ in Dublin where buses simply can’t move for long periods - a classic example is the 18 bus route - it has bus lanes for much of it’s route but the section from Rathmines to Appian Way has no bus lane so this means that every bus loses 15-20 minutes of it’s journey time. The simple solution in other cities is that that section of the route would be bus only in the commuting period. Conor Faughnan would probably view that as tantamount to the Nazification of the state. You might say that the bus shouldn’t go that way - in that case explain to me how one of the few cross-city routes in Dublin could achieve that - seriously! - I’d like your suggestions. At almost every junction at the canals the free flow of buses is prevented by drivers illegally clogging the bus lane - and there are plenty of other spots in the city where this happens. The City Council has loads of high quality CCTV for chrissake - why don’t they use it to nail these individuals. Any city that has a decent public transport system has dedicated, policed bus corridors and has virtually eliminated the car from the city centre - if we don’t do this we can throw our hats at a decent bus service (even if doesn’t go on strike).


#923

There are plenty of bus lanes in Dublin.

The problem is that they are not used efficiently. Buses travel very slowly in them - mainly due to too many stops and people paying the driver.

The ‘drift’ you get in scheduling is down to routes being too long and all being sent through the city centre.

The DART is in place for thirty years and the Luas for ten years and the Dublin Bus network has not been re-designed to fit into them.

Seriously, DB could go from really bad to average with just a few quite minor tweaks.


#924

Plus the level of buses “as seirbhis”. It was unreal in the city centre how many peak time buses were going around out of service, clogging up the roads.

Noticed that in recent years they changed it to ‘entering service’ in some cases. There must have been calls to complain, on joe duffy no doubt. Still shows the inefficiency of having empty diesel burning buses driving down the likes of o’connell st. at 5 o"clock in the evening.


#925

Agreed but there a small number of very critical points such as the ones I listed that reduce the over all efficiency - Minor Tweak No 1

Agreed - we should move to a continental model where you buy a ticket/ book of tickets from a shop/ use a card which lets you make one transport change in a specified period of time. This could be done now (Minor Tweak No 2) but this would require a unified attitude to the transport system.

That’s also part of the problem but to resolve that you’d need to do Minor Tweak No 2 as it is prohibitively expensive to change transport systems

This requires the unified transport system described in Tweak No 2

Absolutely - but it requires a Transport Minister who realises that successful urban economies are based on efficient infrastructure. Not some dick-head who swans in and out of the Dail in a Merc, or who comes from Ballygobshite and can drive for 40 miles in any direction without seeing anything more than a few cows and some trees


#926

Mentioning that Ive never experienced or heard other people complaining about loud radios or dangerous drivers is actually exactly same as you saying that your personal experience is just that…and Im not sure the sexual abuse analogy works either to be honest…

Re the rest, fair enough. You dont like Dublin Bus. Its obviously not the greatest service in the world but its certainly not the worst…and I say that as someone who has relied on public transport in a number of countries beyond Europe…everything is relative…maybe you just need to travel a bit further afield than Germany :wink:

rte.ie/player/ie/show/toughe … /10689839/


#927

Crazy that there’s no standard fare and that one can still pay cash in 2017. People fumbling around for changing & stating their destination to the driver is just so time-consuming.


#928

In fairness there are only three fares, based on the number of stages, for each of cash and Leap. Crazy that cash is allowed but at least the cash fare is a significant uplift on the Leap fare. I presume this gap will increase further to make paying cash absolutely penal.

Also, what effect does the free travel pass have on the economic of Dublin Bus? Are they adequately compensated for carrying the free passengers?


#929

God, but you make a lot of assumptions. What do you want me to do? Tell you that I have been to Third World countries with worse public transport than Dublin? Fine, I have.

I guess what is clear is that we are separated by the fact that you seem to look to the worst and think that what we have is better and therefore shouldn’t be complained about (or improved?). I look to what is better and aspire to that.

In fact, you don’t even need to leave the island to see a better system at work. I have had occasion to visit Newry a few times recently. I took the train up. The train station is located outside of the town and guess what, they, by some magic, know when the the trains are arriving and have buses waiting to bring passengers into Newry centre, ditto on the way back to the station, there are free buses running from the middle of the town to meet every train. And the buses are free! Compare that to trying to get to and from Heuston on the bus. On the quays it is not unusual at 17:10 for the RTPI to read that the next bus to the train station will be in 23 minutes. At rush hour!

With respect to cash payments, leap cards and tourists, I frequently take the #16 to the airport. All the way until about Collins Avenue we pick up tourists, especially so at the weekend. The tourists are usually German, French and Spanish. At each stop the tourist with the best English of the group gets on the bus and tries to buy tickets for everybody in their group with a tenner. The driver explains that she/he cannot take notes. This needs to be repeated a few times until the tourist grasps that fact. The the tourist tries to pay with a card and the process is repeated. Eventually, it comes to be understood that coins are required. All of this is communicated from the group leader back to the rest of the group. They all start rooting around for coins. Sometimes they can gather enough coins and begin the payments, other times they are put off the bus when they cannot find enough coins and told to go and find change somewhere, sometimes they go free. This happens at almost every stop along the way and it is not unusual for the bus to be 4 minutes at each stop. I wrote to Dublin Bus many times asking them, at the very least, to put up multilingual signs at stops along this route to solve this problem, but apparently that is not possible.


#930

^^ or just give customers what they want, by accepting cash and card payments.


#931

next version of Leap will work with debit cards I believe (as has been introduced in London).

In fairness, if I was getting on a bus in a foreign city I’d find out how to buy a ticket first, a lot of city bus services don’t accept cash at all.


#932

The phasing out of cash and removal of notes was based on well-founded safety issues for drivers. I recall that there were a spate of robberies, often violent, which preceded the change.

In this day and age it makes absolutely no sense to accept cash on a bus at anything else than a punitive rate. Between Leap cards and contactless credit/debit it should cover just about any possibility.


#933

Sort of.
They installed those drop boxes for securely paying with coins… I’m sure they cost a fortune. It was the perfect excuse to get rid of cash. Especially in the worst affected areas a lot of people are on passes. I recall a Joe Duffy show (i was in a taxi) when he wondered why DB wouldn’t​ accept fare change receipts as payment. This is what you’re dealing with


#934

But were you listening to Joe Duffy whilst travelling on a bus???

If so, that may constitute cruel and inhumane treatment…you could be in line for compensation…


#935

Martin Luther King, Jr.


#936

Never had to endure Dublin Bus. He could march without fear of the Gardai (mainly because they made up the number of arrests that day).


#937

Amen brother


#938

Bus Éireann and the Unions are leaving the WRC and of to the Labour Court. This really does look like it is going to lead to the company going into Administration.


#939

Do you have any idea of the number of stages any given journey takes, even one you make regularly? I don’t. Anyway, what is a stage? An interval between two stops, I’m guessing, but I’ve never seen it explicitly defined. On top of that, the Luas has zones and the heavy rail services, their own separate pricing system.

Dublin is big enough for a zoned transport system, applied across all road and rail modes. Put a simple map on each stop when the timetables are next posted, or even just put the zone number on the stop.

Something like this:
Zone 1: inside the canals and west to Islandbridge
Zone 2: out to Blackrock, Goatstown, Terenure, Palmerstown, Cabra, north Glasnevin, Killester, Clontarf
Zone 3: Inside the M50
Zone4: The rest of the Dublin transport region out to Greystones, Malahide, Saggart, Maynooth, or wherever it ends.

Charge a fixed fare for travelling within a zone, however many vehicles are used and a fare for crossing a zone boundary. At present, one accumulates extra charges every time one changes vehicle, up to the daily cap. Given the strictly radial nature of Dublin’s transport system, this is a significant disincentive to using public transport for anything other than single radial journeys.

It’s simple, intelligible and consistent and it ain’t rocket science.


#940

I’m glad somebody else noticed this.

thepropertypin.com/viewtopic.php?p=650594#p650594

Actually, that whole thread is just a kind of déja vu. :cry: