Strike Season


#1001

Please don’t attribute words to me that I didn’t write.


#1002

Yes, you have to put in the hours but I can work up a flexi-day by being present for around 20 mins extra each day. (Mostly it’s done by taking the minimum 30-minute lunch break.)

Believe me - not having to get up early, commute into town and put in a day at the office (like I’ll be doing next Friday) feels like a nice bonus. Whether you call it a day “off” or a day “not at work” I’m not too fussed.


#1003

Believe me - not having to get up early, commute into town and put in a day at the office (like I’ll be doing next Friday) feels like a nice bonus. Whether you call it a day “off” or a day “not at work” I’m not too fussed.
Indeed. Nothing at all wrong with it. I replied because Blanchguy was making out that days off for working flexitime were the same as holiday time.
“I don’t know how much holidays nurses get, but the average public servant with flexitime has over 40 days a year, and has much more flexibility than a teacher as to when they are taken. So they aren’t that much worse off than teachers.”
Whereas you have already done your work for Friday.


#1004

With all the AI and automation we have been promised, we should all be working a bit less. If we so wish. Otherwise why is it being introduced and promoted? It wouldn’t be for any other reason. So arguing about who takes what days and when will be somewhat redundant surely. Most will be on a ‘flexitime’

As for the nurses, it may not be the case that this deal settles it for them. Such is the amount the younger cohort feel left behind by, especially in terms of accommodation costs, either rent or looking to buy once they start hitting 30. The root cause is encapsulated by Mr. Noonan’s comments reposted further up the thread - the state sponsored ramping of accommodation costs.


#1005

I think it depends on the role. For a nurse or other roles where there are traditionally rostered hours and overtime, irrespective of whether you are working in the private or public sector, then it is fair to say that flexitime leave built up is just work being displaced and not a bonus as such. But for roles which are traditionally salaried, and you are expected to get the job done even if it means taking an extra 30 minutes or more after the nominal end of the working day, the ability to accumulate those extra minutes and hours as future days off is definitely a valuable bonus and the equivalent to extra holiday time. I would think this applies to most ‘desk jobs’ where the public sector worker gets to accumulate flexi-time while the private sector worker has to just suck it up (or vote with their feet).