Supermarkets


#1

Split from Signs of Depression thread… work away.

Yes that is the way but there is the negative felt on multiple other balances sheets. So the net gain is not stability in the short term. Balances sheet aka the pocket of the people may improve but it is relative to diminished earnings/incomes.


#2

“The overall value of the Irish grocery market fell 0.9pc over the year to August 5.”
People simply can’t afford the rip-off prices of TESCO, Dunnes and SuperQuinn anymore.

If the basic necessities of life are too expensive in Ireland then the nation is uncompetitive and earnings/incomes will be diminished anyhow as jobs move overseas to nations where the inhabitants needs to be paid less just to subsist.


#3

The majority of products are not the basic necessities of life. If its got branding and marketing behind it shouting at you to buy it you probably don’t need it particularly when it’s the food end of the market.


#4

In pure KGs the amount of product you can purchase in a LIDL or ALDI in Germany for €10 is very impressive; fruit juice, fresh fruit, veg, dairy, bread, lightly processed food of all descriptions are all very cheap and much cheaper than I remember in LIDL Ireland.


#5

I dunno, the fruit and veg in the local Lidl and Aldi in Tullamore is pretty cheap, good quality, and has large sourcing in Ireland (i.e. Irish-sourced where the crop exists).


#6

+1. Aldi veg is usually great, certainly compared with the compost Dunnes sell.


#7

I remember when Lidl came to my town about 11 years ago. Their arrival automatically caused the other supermarkets to lower/match their prices and improve quality for key groceries. It was very noticeable.
Now there is a Lidl, Dunnes, Tesco and an Aldi within a 5 minute walk radius. Lidl & Aldi quality of food is excellent particularly their fruit&veg and imported continental foodstuffs such as ham.
I hope Irish consumers continue to switch from branded products to generic store versions and shop around for the best deals.


#8

Or even better, cut out the middlemen and buy directly from farmers markets whenever possible.


#9

thank God for lidl and Aldi…

Great for saving the few bob every week compared to the other clowns!!!


#10

What is most startling in today’s grocery stats is the phenomenal growth of Aldi.

From the Indo:


#11

I have a few of these near me and they have sort of become the place you can pop out to if you need something. This role used to be performed by a garage. The savings between the two (garage to aldi) are massive.


#12

I find that Alidi and Lidl do not stock varied enough products. There’s always something that I wanted and can’t get.

In saying that, I find the “shopping experience” there much preferable to Tesco exactly because of the lack of choice. I find the sheer range of products very confusing and discomforting somehow in Tesco/Superquinn/Dunnes. Maybe its because I’m a man but I actually enjoy the lack of choice and that there isn’t 40 different types of marmalade. Psycologically, I’m happier shopping at Lidl than Tesco - It’s sort of a relief. Am I mad here?


#13

Don’t think you’re mad at all. Likewise I like the lack of choice. One brand of cheese, jam, olive oil etc is enough for me.
Reminds me of eastern european supermarkets in the early 90’s.


#14

and boy do you have to be fast with packing your bags…


#15

I don’t know if you are been funny.

Once again the Indo journos demonstrate their ability to read press release and their inability to understand maths. Aldi do not have 25.2% plus of the market, just their share of the market rose by 25.2%., which is not that amazing, given the low base.

I can see Dunnes and Superquinn been out of the market in a few years. Superquinns will just be SuperValu and Dunnes will be like Pennys,with their usual open management style. Hope Supervalue keep the Superquinn sausages.


#16

The withering look off Petra or Jaroslav if you’re slow…we’ve all been there :smiley:

That’s the thing though. You can convince yourself of how much value you’re getting and how its no different to Superquinn. But the little things remind you that you don’t matter as much as a customer.


#17

There must be a happy medium there somewhere.

One thing that bugs me about Tesco is that sometimes a particular brand will just disappear, to be replaced by another. You get the impression that they are playing one supplier off against another, with a view to forcing prices down. They crossed the rubicon when McCambridge brown bread was replaced by a poor Brennan’s imitation. Utter sacrilege! I read subsequently that McCambridge won a court case forcing Brennan’s to stop using copycat packaging (the zip-lock bags with the green colouring). I considered abandoning Tescos for that one transgression … but normal service was thankfully restored. :smiley:


#18

Maybe you’re doing it wrong.

There is a place to pack bags at your leisure after you’ve gone through the till.
For me, I put a couple of plastic boxes at the bottom of the trolley and shove everything in there. Then it’s easy enough to put the boxes in the back of the car.


#19

Sadly the reason for this is that the management frown on staff who scan less than 30 items a minute, joe till attendant does not personally dislike you and the short loading area means he has nowhere else to put it.


#20

The simplicity of the Aldi/Lidl stores also has an advantage in terms of mental mapping. It’s pretty easy to visualise the walk through the store, and write the shopping list in sequence as you will pass the items.

It’s sort of the opposite of the obfuscated store layouts beloved of Tesco (I’m expecting they’ll soon start employing minotaurs to stack shelves… with all the turmoil in Greece there must be lots of them looking to emigrate).