Tánaiste Simon Covney Confirms 500,000 migrants for Ireland


#28

I think in five years “oh yeah, I had a Facebook page once” will be an oft heard remark.

It inevitable that FB face the same liability standards as established media. I’m suprised it hasn’t happened sooner, although that’s just probably a generational lag, like the Japanese Cyber Security minister who doesn’t use computers!

straitstimes.com/asia/japan … -computers

In one way that’s why I can understand the popularity of Trump, he’s not ashamed of his befuddlement.


#29

Stay on topic. Thanks.


#30

As is to be expected, he didn’t answer the question. He droned on and on for 5 minutes but avoided saying anything so I think that tells you all you need to know about what the Govt’s thinking on this UN agreement is


#31

numbersusa.com/PDFs/The%20C … 20Beck.pdf

jstor.org/stable/2123232?se … b_contents

not saving any money + large population growth/immigration = a long decline to third world status after GFC 2.0


#32

Hmmm, sounds like BS to me.
How about - reliance on an agrarian economy at a time when agriculture declined in importance in international trade? Or a military junta that diverted spending to military vanity projects? Or a disastrous nationalism fueled war? Populist giveaway budgets?

Populism and nationalism, IMO, wot done it…


#33

Immigration to a functioning economy increases nominal GDP, so pinning Brazil’s post-2011 GDP slump on immigration is…dubious.


#34

Compact on Refugees

refugeesmigrants.un.org/refugees-compact

nrc.no/news/2018/november/t … ed-states/


#35

reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.i … ief932.pdf

hell bent on giving migrants/refugees a say in our countries while silencing the incumbents


#36

and nominal GDP masks the real economy, real GDP per capita, disposable income per capita etc.
Look at Australia:

So if that continues and GDP keeps growing what is the result? If it keeps going then eventually the average person ends up in poverty as they reach third world levels. Eventually it all blows up. Anyway its just another way to look at it. Its another, hardly talked about, potential negative consequence.


#37

irishtimes.com/news/world/n … -1.3723972


#38

Argentina has economically underperformed because it does not produce any goods which sell for high prices on global markets.

Even Brazil sells jets.


#39

un.org/press/en/2000/200003 … 4.doc.html

See what the UN called in back in 2000, they must of realized you can’t be that direct


#40

YT Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=Qkl1xGTt9Sw


#41

There’s a meme that I’m particularly fond of that I can’t find at the moment . It goes along the lines of -
There is a plate with 20 cookies on it, the banker takes 19 and points at the 20th and says ‘Oh look the immigrant is trying to steal your cookie’

People are more important than borders or countries. Borders are used by the wealthy to protect their wealth and to arbitrage taxes and currencies. People are following wealth and escaping the destitution caused by the theft of their nations wealth by those accumulating it in the ‘developed’ countries (and I include those of their own countrypeople who stole their wealth and stashed it in our banks)

The problem is not immigration - it is inequality.


#42

It’s a funny auld world.

Syrian woman giving food and clothes to Greek immigrants (refugees) in 1942.

Edit to emphasis the common conflation of terms.


#43

This discussion gets more confused when people use terms interchangeably.
Migrant = Refugee = Economic migrant = Asylum seeker
Mass Migration = Migration = Immigration

BBC wrote some good articles on this.

The battle over the words used to describe migrants
bbc.com/news/magazine-34061097

Asylum seekers, migrants or refugees: Which word is correct?
bbc.com/news/newsbeat-46747502

Also, populist emotional appeals also tend to polarize the discussion and make this topic difficult to discuss and causes more confusion.

[IMHO, that’s fine for some, since in maintains the status quo.]


#44

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greeks_in_Syria

Since there are only about 4500 Greeks in Syria today it seems millions of “Greek refugees” didn’t settle in Syria or the Middle East in the 1940s, so why should we allow millions of Syrians just walk into Europe today ?

No, the problem is too much immigration at a time when almost all European populations are shrinking, your failure to understand demographics of this is leading you astray

It only takes a generation or two before a mismatch in birth rates and excessive immigration can totally transform a country, at this point anyone who doubts it is a fool, but of course the people pushing this agenda hardest know it well


#45

Are you talking about immigration or refugees?

Demographics suggests that in the near future western economies will be competing against eachother for the refugees, whoops sorry, should that be immigrant?

Japan has already given up fighting their agequake.


#46

“western economies will be competing against each other for (skilled) immigrant workers” This statement is probably true. Your original statement is imo propaganda.

It’s called a brain drain.

“Japan has already given up fighting their age quake.” Japans problems are as a consequence of their post ww2 banking system with its boom, bust and stagnation.


#47

I don’t see much difference any more, its clear that most refugees are just economic migrants anyway, the media and the open boarders people just use the word refugess as propaganda