Tánaiste Simon Covney Confirms 500,000 migrants for Ireland


#61

If the ideology is based on an opposition to immigration for economic reasons it would be described as isolationism (as opposed to globalization)

If the ideology is based on an opposition to people from a different country immigrating to your country it would be described as nationalism

If the ideology is based on an opposition to people of a different race immigrating to your country it would be described as racism

If the ideology is based on an opposition to people of a different religion immigrating to your country it would be described as bigotry or religious intolerance

I’m sure there are a few other ideologies that would cause people to oppose immigration - agism, political beliefs, sexual orientation


#62

@metalmike
Thanks. That’s a good description of the main ideologies. Where would Japan fit into that model?

Now the problem I would have this this terminology, “anti-immigration” (anti-anything really) is that it tends polarizes the discussion and turns it into a ideological battle. In ideological battles, you’re either with us or against us.

Take for examples an individual who is of the opinion that mass immigration is not a good idea.
(For financial, culture, fear of potential for ghettoisation…there could be any number of reasons, with supporting arguments)
That does not mean they are “anti-immigration”.
They may welcome the controller immigration of skilled workers.


#63

Yes, this is the way it appears to many people, if you’re against immigration for any reason, you’re accused of having an 'ism.

Thus you are to be considered a bad person!


#64

In global terms, we are the wealthy. We are the ones who need a border to protect us. A reduction in global inequality would massively reduce our living standards.


#65

It’s not a zero-sum game.


#66

or increase the living standards in other countries (unlikely to happen of course).


#67

So…according to the Justice Minister, the Direct Provision system is at breaking point. How on earth are more arrivals going to be facilitated?

independent.ie/irish-news/a … 05778.html
Justice Minister Charlie Flanagan said the service was operating at “full capacity” and “authorities are stretched”.
“The issue of direct provision is a significant challenge and I accept the current regime is far from ideal”


#68

Rubber stamp outstanding applications. Just like with the prisons, when they’re full they release a few prisoners.


#69

I.e. their approach is a clear failure. Cases Should be decided within a few months not 10+ years. Better all round


#70

But…as soon as they receive “leave to remain” they bring in a load of relatives expecting them all to be housed putting more pressure on services.

irishtimes.com/news/social- … -1.3589753
*A scheme where refugees can bring relatives to live in Ireland is putting pressure on homeless services, and pushing refugee families into emergency accommodation, the director of the Dublin Region Homeless Executive (DRHE) has said.
Asylum seekers with permission to remain in Ireland are becoming homeless as an “unintended consequence” of bringing relatives into the country under a humanitarian reunification scheme, according to Eileen Gleeson, head of the DRHE.
*


#71

It is my understanding that all asylum cases are decided by the Department of Justice in a matter of weeks.

However, decisions adverse to the asylum seeker are appealed through the courts, JRed etc. That adds years to the process.

As departments don’t provide details of individual cases, the field is left open to the pro-immigrant advocacy groups to shape the narrative in the media that if only the Dept of Justice got its finger out this would all be sorted.

One case we have details of is Pamela Izevbekhai’s asylum claim because she went public. The Department’s case worker rejected her asylum application in the mid-2000s, she appealed, in 2009 the Guards found factual evidence that her claim for asylum was fraudulent, yet still her case was only finished in the courts in 2011 allowing her to be deported. All the while there was a vocal media campaign for her to stay. It cost the state over €1m.

The International Protection Act was passed in 2015 to tidy up the administrative aspects of asylum processing but there’s a limit to how fast cases can be decided when the legal system allows ample opportunity for delays.


#72

It cost the taxpayer 370k. The rest was unpaid legal bills.


#73

Had the state lost the case, would they (& the taxpayer by extension) also have been liable for the €700,000?


#74

Not sure. I think I read that there were five legal firms involved. Presumably they were banking on a payout.


#75

Taoiseach says visit to Ethiopia changed his perspective on refugee camps
irishtimes.com/news/politics/taoiseach-says-visit-to-ethiopia-changed-his-perspective-on-refugee-camps-1.3755199

‘Irish concerns can’t be dismissed - migration is not just responding to crises,’ insists Taoiseach [paywalled]
independent.ie/irish-news/i … 04053.html


#76

What hotelier in their right mind would want to do this? Unless they were located in some God-forsaken midlands backwater. The locals could be unforgiving as it can affect business in a small town and put pressure on local state services. Anyway - I predict this will become an even bigger issue in the coming months.

irishtimes.com/news/social- … -1.3758058
*The Department of Justice has issued an urgent call for expressions of interest from hotels and guest houses willing to provide emergency full-board accommodation for asylum seekers for up to six months.

The call-out, which appeared on the Reception and Integration Agency (RIA) website and as an advertisement in The Irish Times on Monday, said it was seeking temporary housing as an “interim measure” to meet the “urgent and increase demand for accommodation” for asylum seekers.*


#77

I wonderz does fire insurance becomes null and void if you express an interest as a hotelier because if it doesn’t this could be seen as a nice little earner. :angry:


#78

LOL


#79

The government fund most of these to some extent, why fund them if they are going to spin it like this?


#80

A lot of them are co-funded by the EU, our Govt and the likes of Soros/Feeney.
The Govt have to be seen to be supporting these groups or else they’ll get a kicking in Brussels (and Leo certainly will never countenance that) as well as criticism from the various UN bodies in Switzerland who regularly issue reports on this,that and t’other in Ireland