The Economic Impact of Covid 19


#165

Making it up is exactly what they are doing.


#166

As I’ve said on other threads here - you’re in for a long sh*tyy winter of lockdowns - watch the economy slowly sink and the house prices follow soon after.

Sell sell sell!


#167

I think we need a guide to living with NEPHT. I think they have overextended and removed any remaining goodwill this time.


#168

DJT


#169

No level 5. As you are for Dublin and rest of the country joins us at level 3

Micheal most likely couldnt sell it to party TDs who in turn couldnt sell it to constituents. Duffys circus all round.

Interesting to note that lefties like Coppinger and Boyd Barrett are straight out of the traps to suggest that blood will be on the Govts hands for failing to lockdown if numbers rise. They really want the economy to tank so as to make capital from the ensuing human misery.


#170

The fiscal cost of the pandemic is becoming clearer but it could get even worse:

€42 billion in 2020 and 2021 could quickly become €47 billion or more and the momentum of economic recovery would be halted, with unemployment remaining above 14 per cent.

Almost all of this deficit is due to increased government spending. The only tax cut worth noting is the VAT reduction from 13.5 per cent to 9 per cent. No help if your pub or restaurant is closed.

When did economic stimulus become synonymous with increased government spending?

Will this largesse become permanent?


#171

In a word, yes.

They have just bought compliance and loyalty sweetened with hope .

Art/life. https://youtu.be/hS57I6swXcc

Wakey peeps.


#172

Interesting take on the future of what became a cash cow for the education sector over the past decade.

This should result in lower rents in the short term and will put financial pressure on Irish 3rd level institutions over the medium to longer term.

The linked Journal article is here


#173

I can see a number of the student developments that have sprung up being taken over by the councils to alleviate the pressures they are facing, so a bail out in effect. The Greens have signalled that Direct Provision is going to end over the next few years so this might assist them in that endeavour. Hopefully students manage to get cheaper rent out of this. Though if general rents drop considerably in the medium term they might start looking at renting in the places they got priced out of in the last 7-8 years.

Those new developments under construction in Belfield are a sight to behold. If foreign students don’t return in large numbers then they will have a serious hole in their finances.