The International Trade (War) Thread


#1

For discussions on NAFTA/Trans Pacific etc etc

Pros & Cons, rights and wrongs etc

Is free trade fair trade?

Whose interests are given priority? The public or business?

Is it a race to the bottom? Why do some people call is undemocratic?

Is it luddite to oppose these deals?

Do deficits matter?


#2

bbc.com/news/business-32498715

Full text
mfat.govt.nz/en/about-us/wh … rtnership/

18 December 2014

bbc.com/news/uk-politics-30493297


#3

theguardian.com/commentisfr … the-bottom

news.com.au/national/breakin … 7a4c4d4ec4

who is right? Which is a race to the bottom, free trade or tariffs?


#4

epi.org/publication/briefingpapers_bp147/


#5

bloomberg.com/news/articles … everywhere


#6

bloomberg.com/news/articles … paper-says


#7

globaltimes.cn/content/1093360.shtml

theaustralian.com.au/news/l … b0e0af1164


#8

bloomberg.com/news/articles … unwinnable


#9

I’m going out on a limb here without evidence. Lagarde predicting that trade wars are unwinnable. Unlikely Lagarde ever traded anything in her life.


#10

Well, didn’t China win a few trade wars recently by producing a large quantity of goods cheaper than the other countries and selling them to eager traders who were quite happy to shun the locally produced stuff.

Plus the fact that they enticed a large number of business leaders to switch production to China as well.

So, yes, if you pick the right battles.


#11

abc.net.au/news/2018-03-23/t … ar/9578402

Trump cites IP theft as a reason for this, alongside a trade deficit and loss of manufacturing.

This is from 2013:
bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-china-22634685

How come it took until Trump to do anything real about this?


#12

I believe Japan was accused of the same thing in the 50’s and 60’s. The US didn’t do anything about that either. I wonder what has changed in the US that has made them sit up and notice now.


#13

Japan wasn’t making the network switches and routers that all information of any value is passing through (or accessible from) today.


#14

Good point but that would only be an argument for creating protection around IT equipment not aluminium and steel. Before routers and switches there was telecoms switches which were manufactured by numerous companies around the world but no-one felt the need for them to be manufactured in specific countries.


#15

The US had a hell of a lot of manufacturing in the 50s and 60s even still until recently. Around 2000 is when it drops like a stone - What happened around then?

money.cnn.com/2017/04/07/news/ec … index.html

Trade deficits matter, trade deals matter
epi.org/publication/manufac … e-culprit/

so does currency manipulation


#16

Questions and answers here (worth a read):
promarket.org/globalization-con … ies-apart/

The paper
nber.org/papers/w24344


#17

robertreich.org/post/36219730368

What is this guys solution?

This is just another reason why Trump got in, the mainstream politicians are yapping about increasing mcdonalds workers pay to boost the economy while claming trade deficits are ok.


#18

Trump’s most hardcore America First trade adviser (Peter Navarro) is on the brink of getting a lot more power
vox.com/policy-and-politics … l-aluminum

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Navarro

youtube.com/user/DeathByChina/featured

…interesting times


#19

The Republicans won’t do anything about it; it was a Republican administration that oversaw the collapse of manufacturing in the US. Will the Democrats? Probably not, they’re too up the liberal/fascist IT state’s arse (socially liberal, organisationally fascist).

Globalisation has been a bad thing for most of us; at the same time being in a large trade block is our only/best protection. Go figure…


#20

Let me see: globally, the number of people living in extreme poverty has more than halved in the last 25 or so years.
datatopics.worldbank.org/sdgatla … verty.html

For most of who, exactly, has globalisation been a bad thing?