The Pretty Charts thread


#221

You can also see the month-on-month changes here.


#222

Pretty Charts (more info and links here)


#223

Looks like the increase have slowed dramatically. Also interesting in the increase in available rentals over the last 12 months


#224

Pretty Charts (more info and links here)


CSO Infographic accompanying December 2018 figures


#225

Pretty Charts (more info and links here)


#226

The PPR hasn’t been updated since 13th Feb. It has skipped the odd week in the past - but never this long. We are, I suspect, heading into one of the more interesting quarters in the Dublin property market. Perhaps there is a conspiracy afoot - I love a good conspiracy - or maybe the person who updates it is off skiing in Val d’Isere?


#227

#228

#229

Pretty Charts (more info and links here )

Monthly

Quarterly


#230

@ps200306 daft.ie is down, what did you do @ps200306!!! :astonished:


#231

:wink: 'Tis back now!


#232

Pretty Charts (more info and links here )

Monthly

Quarterly


#233

Interesting. It would seem that volumes of sales in Dublin is topping off at the same time sales prices is doing something similar.

This would tally with affordability biting or a mismatch of price expectation and purchasing power. Is there any sense of an increase in stock for sale at the moment in Dublin?


#234

Thanks again, PS2. As always, this is more informative than the Irish media who all say property inflation is slowing down whereas your CSO chart shows that prices have been falling since December on a Q-on-Q basis. As I said in January, this could be just a seasonal effect but I think by May or June we will have a Y-on-Y decline in Dublin prices. I expect to see some inflation return in September when the May/June sales are registered. Property price inflation for the full year 2019 is unlikely to exceed 2% and could be flat depending on macro-economic factors.

Everyone knows we had a world-record collapse in house prices in 2008/09 - we went from an annual price inflation of 23.7% in August 2006 to deflation of -28.1% in June 2009. But Irish people haven’t recognised that our recent boom was an equally dramatic reversal - we went from annual deflation of -21.1% in Feb. 2012 to annual inflation of 27.9% in Sept. 2014. Look no further for an explanation.

“Within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro. And believe me, it will be enough.”

Mario Draghi, London, 26 July 2012

Isn’t the price curve supposed to be steeper during the bust than in a boom?


#235

Posted by Ronan Lyon on irisheconomy.ie

NTMA Chief Economist Rossa White and Lisa Sheenan of Queen’s University Belfast have released a new paper, characterising Ireland’s financial cycle, in the first of a new NTMA Research series.


#236

Just catching up on this. At the moment supply on MyHome is about 5450 and is rising by about 100 a week - I’d view this as normal for recent peak selling season - last August it was up about 5600. Sales on the PPR are running at about 300 per week and are pretty much in line with last years at the same time. There is a disparity between median asking price (395k - MyHome) and median selling price (335k -PPR) in Dublin - this has widened by about 5k in the last 3 months , 10k in the last 7 months. On the anecdotal side most of the people I work with who are looking for houses don’t even bother looking in Dublin - you need a combined salary of just under 100k to buy at the median level in Dublin plus you need 35k cash - just not do-able for most people.

The determination of the government to push people into rental on behalf of their financial backers is depressing. The number of straight to rental apartments is crazy and the rents (a recent article in the SBP mentioned rents of 2400 and 3850 for two bed apartments) can only be supported by people living at a rate of 4 to a two bed apartment.


#237

It really is shameful but Paddy will put up with it. We are not like the French. If I was in charge I’d jack the rents up more and sure it will be grand. Until it isn’t…