The rise of high-rise in Ireland


#1

Initially it was the Docklands area of Dublin which was given a green light to finally start building up beyond 20 storeys. It seems more are trickling out now…

Is this a sign of things to come?


#2

The single biggest issue IMO that hinders scale and operability of public transport is higher density accommodation. I really hope we see lots more of this, in every city.


#3

The other thing is that there are no new green spaces being created. If they are going to allow highrises there needs to be places were people can see greenery and sunlight.


#4

I hope high density is consigned to history. Electric cars mean we can travel with minimum environmental damage.

Go high rise this generation but then what does the next generation do if you fail to address endless growth?


#5

You can travel in your car, so can I. When everyone wants to travel in their own car and lives where they want to (or strives to) you have gridlocked motorways and long commutes. Population centres with high density is the only way to make public transport feasible like New York or Berlin. The public transport system in Berlin is a dream and it works for two reasons - high population density and the trust system which is properly policed.


#6

i dont thin berlin is any greater population density than Dublin but it does have a higher overall population


#7

image

Dublin has a similar density to Amsterdam and a higher density than Berlin (3,809 people /km2 for city boundary area)


#8

FYI the NYC subway, the French metro in Paris, London underground… should all be feasible right? Why are they all subsided?

High population density works for the rich mostly and public transport systems only work if we are all going the same direction basically.

Home ownership rates are also lower in apartments, why ? Because they are less desirable. They are also less healthy places to raise children. No gardens and all the benefits playing in the dirt does to their immune systems. High density city living means more competition And smaller living space which increases the rates of mental illness.

Apartments only make sense near or in towns and cities meaning they are never the cheaper option. People prefer houses and houses in the suburbs tend to be cheaper than inner city apartments


#9

So we already have the denisty, it’s a different problem. Surely no-one is arguing you don’t need high population density to make public transport feasible?

The French Metro: If the drivers are on the same deal as the train drivers where they retire at 53 then that might answer that. The Guardian article doesn’t tell me anything illuminating, The MTA is subsidised but it’s not huge @ about 1$ in 15