Unemployment rises to 14.9%


#565

…or be like the Roman road network which helped turned Britain in to an industrial nation.
There are a number of towns in the midlands which would be wasteland without good links to Dublin.


#566

Very true. I really do believe Limerick is a great position for growth with a good university and Shannon airport nearby.


#567

I am not sure if you are taking the p1ss here or not.
Where would you think the growth would come from?


#568

Limerick was traditionally a manufacturing base wasn’t it? Labour costs would have to fall significantly to make it attractive for that again. Which means minimum wage, union participation and especially welfare would have to fall.


#569

Is it not the cheapest base of its size in the country?


#570

Well, there’s manufacturing and manufacturing. Cork in particular, but also Galway, do pretty well on that score and they’re the most expensive Irish cities outside Dublin. Let’s face it, Seattle, Oxford and Toulouse all have significant manufacturing bases, by added value and export earnings, relative to their country’s norms and they’re not the cheapest places in the world. Germany as a whole is expensive in world terms, but Munich manages plenty of manufacturing, even for Germany.

Limerick and the wider lower Shannon region has always struck me as as somewhere that almost goes out of its way to miss opportunities. The region has all of decent communications (the second biggest airport in Ireland, a decent port, a two and a half hour motorway to Dublin), a (relatively small, but growing) indigenous base of expertise in higher education institutions and a pool of experienced employees, including at least a few already at large companies that mesh well with that expertise (Element Six, for example). There are really quite interesting things going on in both UL and LIT, together with some money to develop them and Limerick is a decent, if not wildly exciting place to live.

It’s probably the most infuriating place in Ireland, in terms of its absolute, bloody minded determination to keep on dropping the ball. :frowning:


#571

Perhaps, but that’s kind of like being the best bullfighter in Alaska.


#572

Limerick is now a comfortable distance from the urban centres of Dublin, Cork and Galway.

It has a decent university and reasonable amenities.

It also has very cheap housing by Irish urban standards. Waterford is also as cheap but lacks a university and proximity to the other urban centres.

If I was locating something medium-skilled in Ireland (manufacturing or back-office work needing a few hundred people) I would pick Limerick as you would be able to pay the most competitive wages and get sufficient graduates of decent quality.


#573

I don’t disagree about its innate qualities. It would be fine if you were building an indigenous company. Not a bad place to locate it, and probably loads of grants. But imagine trying to relocate your managers or non-English-speaking CSRs from the UK or some other European location to Limerick.

It also depends on what sort of manufacturing you mean. Stuff like Dell used to do isn’t predominantly graduates, so you’d have to ask why you’d chose Limerick over, saw Kracow. Or a dozen other places in Europe where unskilled labour is cheaper. Same for back office – what % need to be grads? If you mean pharma, yeah I can see why it might be attractive if you need a few dozen grads, but again why not somewhere else in Europe?


#574

It doesn’t appeal personally. But I know several people who moved to Limerick in their 20s and had a fun time.

On your other point, it is quite easy to get a degree in something these days. I interviewed a bunch of potential entrants a while back and struggle to think what we would have got if we *hadn’t *specified a degree…


#575

I guess my point is that not too many manufacturing plants will only employ 100 local unemployed people. It becomes a harder sell when you’re relocating senior people to somewhere like Limerick or Waterford, precisely because high unemployment means you’re not going to have a local hipster ecosystem. You may actually have to pay them more than if they were in Dublin or Cork. And you don’t actually save that much on the junior people due to generous welfare.


#576

You say that as if its a bad thing


#577

Most Political parties in Ireland seem to operate to that tenant…buys the votes


#578

The real rate is 17.8% I believe (from another thread)


#579

You are unaware of the thrills most multi-national home cities have to offer. Limerick beats Tulsa into the ground. Sadly for Limerick, it’s often literally…


#580

Well my last MNC was based in Reston. Sooooo yeah.


#581

I was really shocked by how emptied out Cork had become since I’d last been there over a decade ago, they tell me a lot of business migrated out to Mahon Point.


#582

Ireland really doesn’t do Cities. We don’t really do setting goals and building the infrastructure to meet those goals. Look at charity sector running large sections of the health care system or Religious organisations running the schools.


#583

Quarterly National Household Survey Q2 2016 is out tomorrow which should give us the revised unemployment rates to June 2016

cso.ie/en/newsandevents/stat … ecalendar/


#584

QNHS Q2 2016 stats are out

cso.ie/en/releasesandpublica … rter22016/