We WANT homelessness


#41

From a report title “Women’s Homelessness in Europe” we have a new definition of what is regarded as homeless where people who have a safe place to stay are counted as homeless. Did the survey also count men who couch surf as homeless as well or was this category only reserved for women and what was the methodology of the people conducting the survey? If the survey is redefining homelessness in this manner then is is confirming how much more care is taken of women and how much harsher men in the same situation are treated and why the majority of actual homeless people we meet on the street are men.


#42

There’s also some data from the CSO 2016 which describes the situation @ 58/42% male/female homeless.
cso.ie/en/csolatestnews/pres … inireland/


#43

This is from a few years ago…

independent.ie/irish-news/n … 04937.html
*In 2010, in Dublin alone, there were four outreach services, 24 day centres, support and advice services, 14 emergency facilities, 20 transitional housing services, 14 long-term supported housing services and four settlement services.

This does not include domestic violence services or services for homeless young people. More significantly, it does not include 33 private emergency accommodation facilities.
Between them, the 23 homeless charities in Dublin employ nearly 900 full-time equivalent employees in statutory and voluntary homeless services and several hundred more on a part-time basis.

CSO filings examined for 2013 show that the top 12 homeless charities receive over €78m in income of which well over €25m is spent on staff payroll.

Questions must be asked: is this huge amount of resources being well spent? Is there duplication? Are there better alternatives? Who supervises and co-ordinates these many agencies?*


#44

Ok. That’s were she is pulling some of the data (4,018 men and 2,888 women) on the night of the census. (85% men sleeping rough on the street). The ebook is available for €75 and the website is offline. Methodology from 2014 is covered here and here.

FactCheck: Does Ireland really have a low rate of homelessness by international standards? - -> thejournal.ie/fact-check-hom … 5-Nov2017/

Spain may be a case that parallels Irelands own in regards to public housing. In Irelands case the empty apartments were sold via the NAMA vehicle to foreign hedge funds.

Homelessness in Spain Is on the Rise, and Owners Are Getting Rough as They Try to Get Squatters Out - -> newsweek.com/homeless-spain- … ive-627190


#45

WTF ?
So if you’re living with family members, friends or acquaintances you’re now homeless ?

Under this categorisation, I am officially homeless.


#46

Don’t you have to be living with family or friends temporarily due to a lack of housing to be ‘officially’ homeless?.


#47

McVerry said exactly the same thing last week…he went even further and said that people in their 30s still “living at home” because they can’t afford a house should be included in homeless figures. Insane!

(My daughter is officially “homeless” in Sydney. Earning $72k annually, staying near the beach and having the time of her life - but because her accommodation is currently temporary and uncertain, she falls under the “homeless” category by Irish standards. And she couldn’t care less!)


#48

So at least 8,512 officially homeless and a minimum of €78m per year being spent in the area.
€9,164 per person.
Every year.


#49

er… what?

Fr Peter McVerry (who you guys seem to hate for some odd reason?) laughed at the idea that Leo Varadkar was comparing Ireland’s homeless rate to countries that include ‘couch surfers’ and people who live at home with elderly parents. He said that if Leo Varadkar wanted to include those in Ireland’s statistics that the number of homeless in Ireland would be closer to 80,000 than 8,000.


#50

You should clarify that Peter McVarry never said that. Don’t be telling lies about the man.


#51

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DO_z1K6WsAEy_9z.jpg:large


#52

Lies, damn lies and statistics

Yes Ireland has a first world homeless problem - not as bad as the local VI or the far left would like us to believe.

Now let’s define what we mean by homeless …


#53

rte.ie/radio/utils/radiopla … %2D2017%5F

Father MacVerry said 8 mins 30 in “if we included people in their 30’s and 40’s still living with their parents because they can’t afford to move out our homeless figures would up around 70 or 80 thousand”.

Broadening definitions for greater media impact can be counter productive as it will hurt people who need the most acute help by redirecting funding.

Countries will measure homelessness differently but which countries actually include people living with their parents as homeless? It could be out medical necessity or many other reasons rather than just money.


#54

Yes, and he is laughing at how Lying Leo and the Blueshirts think that it’s appropriate to compare Ireland’s homeless rate directly to countries that include those people in their statistics. It’s mad that people can have a different understanding on such simple words, but then again you see that a lot around here.


#55

@Coles2

That’s very strong language.

I don’t see that. Sure posters may have criticisms (right or wrong). But hate?


#56

Well, when you misrepresent somebody as trying to expand the definition of homelessness (when they clearly weren’t) and when label somebody “insane” who deals with the problem at coalface and understands all the issues, and by default you agree with Leo and Eoghan’s daft rationalisations…what other adjectives come to mind other than “hate” ?


#57

McVerry said this about official homeless statistics:

“It doesn’t include the people in their 30s and 40s who are living at home because they can’t afford a house.”

That’s right. He said some people living *at home *should be included in homeless statistics. That’s clearly insane.

No other country in the OECD report includes (in their homeless stats) say an unmarried daughter or son in their 30s who happen to be still in the original family home because they can’t afford to buy a house of their own. Some countries included people staying temporarily with family or friends - which is a different thing altogether to a son or daughter who hasn’t moved out of the family home.

It’s all here!
oecd.org/els/family/HC3-1-Ho … lation.pdf

The countries that don’t describe those staying with family/friends temporarily as “homeless” include, Canada, Austria, France, Spain, Poland, Portugal and Japan. Others such as Germany, Norway, Sweden and the UK do include them. So McVerry and his followers are wrong to suggest that all other countries include them and that Ireland is out of step.


#58

@HiFi,
I don’t think you can gauge if Fr. McVerry is sane or insane. He might be wrong, or he might be exaggerating to make a point wrt to Mr Varadkar’s earlier statement .

I think you would agree that if we are going to compare the homelessness across countries we should be using the same metrics in the different countries we are measuring…


#59

Hold on a sec. I was listening to McVerry on Sean O’Rourke. The TONE of what he was saying about people living with their parents was that they clearly aren’t “homeless” in the Irish meaning of it. His point was that different countries have different ways of calculating homelessness so Varadkar’s comparisons are asinine. He was NOT trying to expand the Irish definition of homelessness.

What he cares about is issues like that there are people kipping on the floor of his cafe and there didn’t use to be. The Catherine Noonan idiot was saying ‘we have services, don’t be doing soup runs it interferes’. His point is ‘your services are grossly inadequate ! Look at what I have to do !’

You don’t see his points? You think he wants to expand the “homeless industry” ? Seriously ?


#60

Fr McVerry on Newstalk now talking about ‘culturally appropriate’ accommodation for Travellers and that it should include both Summer and Winter seasons.
Negligible cost he reckons (to the Taxpayer)!