What is there for teenagers to do in your area?


#41

Snipers on the roof. One clean shot from a SIG-Sauer.


#42

lived in rural Ireland for years, we have small houses comparing internationally, 2,200 sq ft is very rare even in rural Ireland but its the average in Australia & Canada and the US is higher. Our average is under 1,000! 2,200 sq ft & above is something you would find around where Bono lives and where Gay Byrne lives.

news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/8201900.stm
demographia.com/db-intlhouse.htm

During the boom we built smaller and smaller dwellings. We built more than enough tiny apartments.
viewtopic.php?f=4&t=1861

^^ Its an old thread but the trend from the year 2000 to 2004 was that Bungalows and detached houses were being built in decreasing numbers not just as a %. While apartments and semi-ds were trending upwards.


#43

Yeah, was driving some Swedes around Dublin a few weeks ago and one of the comments was “OMG your houses are so small!”

My childhood was in rural Ireland, really nothing to do, going walking or cycling around, meeting friends, swimming in local river, and later swimming in local lakes.
Of course becasue we were an impoverished family we kids were forced into child labour from about 6 years of age to work on the farm, which we kept up till leaving it.
Joined a karate club when I was 13 or 14 keopt at it for a good few years.
All those activities are available to youngsters today (ok will be swimming in a pool) and far more. I don’t accept there is no activities, just maybe not so many where an adult will bring grown teenagers to another adult to entertain them. At some stage kids and adults need to learn how to entertain themselves. these days parents spend there free time driving kids around and entertaining them, building up expectations, and when this full time job is stopped, at a very important growing up stage for kids it’s hard.
Todays attitude to child labour is quite hard on kids as well, leading to disabilities and dysfunction later.


#44

Yes, the average house here is too small for even a small family once kids reach their teens. Finding a half-decent house of half-decent size in a half-decent area at a reasonable price is almost impossible. And that goes for renting as much as buying.


#45

Quite inefficient use of space too in my opinion. Lots of modern/bubble era houses have far too many bathrooms and hallways and not enough living space.

The economics of it was I believe to allow for ‘sharing professionals’ to each have a big bedroom with an en-suite, so that the ginormous mortgage of the BTL landlord could be serviced. Glorified bedsits with common kitchen and living rooms


#46

The ensuite bathroom is an absurdity. There, I’ve said it. Hate them. I’m sorry if it drags the teenager post off topic.


#47

16 year olds need somewhere to squeeze the spots…


#48

Adding a bathroom is also a relatively cheap way to make a small gaff more “luxurious”.


#49

I think the Rumpus room idea is excellent! Would work well the crappy climate in Ireland


#50

There are 2 or 3 council estates near enough to where I live they all have community centres and free classes + volunteering (art, music, drama, singing, cake sales etc.) But they are not open to anyone not living in the estate so kids from private estates cannot attend.

We have astro pitches, basketball pitches, tennis courts and a playground and all the kids seem to hang around there. BUT the council estate kids are more than welcome to come use our facilities too. Integration and all that jazz!!

So I think it is purely down to the estate or the residents association in the area.


#51

If the kids are reduced to crapping in the neighbours’ gardens, I’d have thought the problem was too few bathrooms, rather than too many.