Will Ireland survive the Woke wave?


#21

That is true, there was no referendum.
There was however credit extended, and the borrower is always servant to the lender as the Good Book tells us.

& if the lender demands restructuralization of the labour market…


#22

Will Ireland survive the Woke wave?

Maybe with humour. And Satire. Remember that?

The Irish Slimes twitter parody account can be a hoot

https://twitter.com/IrishSlimes


#23

TCD cancels the arch-atheist


#24

Ya can’t say “boo” these days but you can say “boogaloo” right, am I right, am I???


#25

Account suspended


#26

It’s interesting, to see the big tech crackdown, that has been abundantly apparent vis a vis the US for nearly all of the Trump years, in it’s consistent, insidious and unwavering bias, having reached a type of rapaciousness this year (think Qanon accounts + some more) seeping into Irish online life… a new kind of tech bubble/s - looks more like cellular model of compartmentalisation. :whistle:

On that note https://twitter.com/officialmcafee has been doing it right and scores high for edutainment value alone.

Some more notes - https://twitter.com/officialmcafee/status/1309104926816075784


#27

#28

Removing the leftover symbols of the theocracy we once lived in is not part of the woke wave or if it is then it a welcome part. If true choice to send your child to a denominational school or not existed then the symbols would be ok, but there isn’t.


#29

Why do people persist in this Una gibberish ? Have you never cleared out a dead relative’s home ? The fact is the people were religious. It was not a “theocracy”.


#30

Is that really what is going on?

Reading that article, I would say no.

Which is what I suspected.

This kite was flown by Leo some time back. Oh I know, separation of Church and State and all that jazz, but to my way of thinking the State likes to cross dress, to use an old probably totally un-woke or un-pc phase.

Bizarrely life was much calmer and friendly in the later stages of this “theocracy” you speak of, which I never exactly experienced as I am told that I did, by those hardly born or born at all and then those who should know better.

I would also beg to differ, that the same source as the “woke” wave or “wokeness” is very much behind this continuation of the program social changes after social change.


#31

I don’t know the Una you refer to, but this kind of sums up my view.

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/letters/church-and-state-in-modern-ireland-1.3630863#


#32

I think this version sums up a similar view.

Sir, – Dr Martin Hanrahan (September 3rd) seeks to spread more broadly the blame for the terrible things done by people within the Coronavirus Pandemic, but he fails to recognise the extraordinary control over Irish society wielded by the Roaming Virus. I grew up in the 80’s, 90’s 00’s. I was raised, educated and fully indoctrinated as a Global citizen. I well remember the overwhelmingly strong and pervasive power of the Coronavirus.

Ireland was then like a theocracy. Every public, civic and social institution was in thrall to the Roaming Coronavirus, and not just the Irish media. Masks and human distancing was a strict social obligation, the Covid-19 catch-all was a parallel and superior law, the religiously driven stigma of accusation of living hung over all of us like a horrible pall and the danger of death by the virus was real, potentially leading to social restrictions for everyone. The belt of the Burning Man Witch hunt’s could and did end careers.

Speaking up to the institution of the Health Bodies (NPHET) was the road to early involuntary emigration.

Roaming Coronavirus of a Jansenist kind permeated every crease and fold of society. The power, influence, temporal and spiritual control of the Covid-19’s were ubiquitous and all seeing. We were truly a virus-ridden society.

Education, health, justice, law, politics and social policy were all under the absolute dominion of the institutional Roaming Coronavirus.

In such a technocratic environment, it was hardly possible that any journalist could have challenged the hegemony of the Roaming Coronas, even if there had been any external contemporaneous awareness of the dark, vile and secret evils lurking within the institutional Health Bodies.

It would be unfortunate if a new revisionism were to remove the much deserved blame from the institutional Romaing Coronavirus and invalidly diverted the blame to the other institutions in society.

– Yours, etc,

Anto D’Lay,
Biosphere 1.


#33

No harm reminding people what the country was like when our head of state was literally also the head of the official religion. The media, academics and NGOs never seem to go back before 1920 when they publish one of their incessant muck-raking reports; you’d almost think there was some agenda to denigrate the concept of an independent Irish state.


#34

Because it makes the “struggle” seem all the more heroic, some people really do believe that Eamon Casey and Fr Peter Mcverry are every bit as bad as the mad Mullahs in Saudi Arabia or Afghanistan

They like to see themselves as rebels fighting the system/man, if you point out to them that they are now the establishment, they will deny it until they turn blue in the face, just look at Mullally for example, writes for the IT, and was appointed to a government quango, but truly believes she oppressed by the dark forces of the extreme right that run the country


#35

I can’t speak for the 50s and 60s as I grew up in the 70s, but that letter completely fails to resonate with me. Most of the parents I knew were enthusiastically, voluntarily practicing Catholics. Most of my peers were budding atheists, and experimented with all the “divilment” that young people get up to. I don’t remember any bands of theocratic thought police “pervading every corner of society”, nor any “overwhelmingly strong and pervasive power of the Roman Catholic Church”. We all got on with whatever the hell we wanted.

Also, since having a rekindled interested in Catholicism in later life, I fancy I can more easily spot someone with an agenda. For a start, it’s not called “the Roman Catholic Church” (or, at least, that’s not its own name for itself). And it’s complete nonsense to say “the Roman Catholic catechism was a parallel and superior law”. Show me the catechism from the 1960s? There wasn’t any in general circulation. The one we have today dates from 1992. The previous one was the Trent Catechism from 1566 which I doubt any ordinary person in Ireland had ever heard of in the 1960s or since.

There were two short question-and-answer style catechisms in general circulation, the Penny Catechism being the most popular which most people encountered in extract form as a couple of dozen questions in an appendix to their religious schoolbooks. (If you’re under 50, you probably haven’t encountered even these). They don’t contain anything whatsoever pertaining to civil law. I’m going to bet a pound to a pinch of shit that the author of that letter has no idea what the Catholic catechism is.

Basically, the modern woke reconstructed memory of an Irish theocracy is the same sort of exercise as when Enlightenment liberals invented the term “The Dark Ages” for a period that was clearly unenlightened compared to themselves.


#36

Oh really :rofl:. The things you learn eh ?

Soz – need to correct that…
http://www.moriarty-tribunal.ie/images/transcript_171.pdf (at page 4)
“Q. And I understand from My Friend Mr. Fitzsimons that these were dictated by Mr. Anthony Lang, one of the solicitors in the firm of Kilroy’s, from handwritten
notes he made at the meeting and that his method of working is that once he dictates the notes he destroys
the handwritten notes. So just to explain the circumstances of these being typewritten notes.
Now, it is headed “Attendance, 4th November, 1997, re meeting of directors of ESAT Digifone Limited, not a formal board meeting, at the offices of IIU, 4th block, Irish Financial Services Centre, Dublin.”


#37

You might have to join the dots between Shatter / Kenny and Lang for me, and Langs involvement in Moriarty doesn’t invalidate his views for me on the letter in the Times.


#38

I think a bigger dose of Catholicism would have done him good.