Your Brexit Contiengcy planning, do you even have any?


#61

It smacks of “if your friend jumped off a cliff, would you?” Clearly the answer for some people is “yes”.


#62

Do you not understand that I would be laughing at the irony of such a thing happening? Who is talking about following the UK anywhere? Please read my post again.


#63

I thought you were? If we don’t follow the UK, there’s a border. We can’t insist (to the EU) that the EU suddenly has no border between Ireland and the UK.

If following them out is not what you’re suggesting, I don’t understand what you’re complaining about the EU negotiating position?


#64

Which would of course beg the question of what exactly is the point of a backstop, purportedly designed to avoid the implementation of said border, (in accordance with the terms/spirit of the GFA), that will now seemingly insist on the implementation of the very thing it is supposedly designed to avoid ie a so called hard border imposed (most likely) by the people who claim to be most opposed to it ie the Irish State.

However we already have Irish cabinet Ministers (presumably with the approval of Brussels) leaking suggestions to the effect that a blind eye may be turned for some time post-B day in order to keep the wheels of industry turning. These positions are difficult to reconcile.

Its worth remebering also that the UK is not Kazakhstan. Its not Turkey. Its not even Ukraine. It has operated in accordance with EU rules for decades. Theres no reason that that need necessarily change overnight post Brexit and “turning a blind eye” is probably merely pragmatic recognition of this fact.

Beyond that, yes this whole mess has been caused by the British but our chosen tack, which (if were being honest) was presumably designed to try and keep the UK within the EU, appears likely to have failed. Its now time for a plan B which entails damage limitation from an Irish perspective on two fronts ie political in terms of the North and economic in terms of the entire island.

The current approach is gifting the looney fringe of the British right the ability to cast thenselves in Churchillian Blitz mode. It seems to me to betray a deep misunderstanding of the pig headedness of a particular type of Englishman, the very type that the same approach has assisted in placing at the centre of Government.

In fact at this point its not clear that the interests of Ireland and the EU remain in alignment. Perhaps the best result from an Irish perspective at this stage would be for Johnson to get an overall majority and then, while not being reliant on the DUP, seek to revisit the idea of a border of sorts at the Irish sea. Hopefully our side are open to that because there doesnt seem to be too many alternatives beyond No Deal. As others have noted recent Unionist noises would suggest there may now be some give in their position around this issue.

Youd have to wonder however whether No Deal is not in fact the EU’s preferred outcome. And youd really have to hope its not the Irish Governments.


#65

No Deal is the preferred Brexiter outcome. It’s a mistake to see it as the looney right driving this, most of the centre right is there too. The defections are from the wets, there’s almost no chatter from the backbenches that no deal is a bad thing.

Ireland and the EU have always been open (and remain open) to a border of sorts (and it is of sorts) in the Irish sea. It has been resuggested a number of times for those paying attention to what’s happening.


#66

As the outlook appears increasingly bleak, what do pinsters think border checks will have on the wider economy?


#67

How will we cope without cheap booze from Newry?

No bread, for one.
It will be like the previous snow storm only with bells on.

im sure we will survive but the economy will be hit. I dont see the people around the border taking too kindly to checks etc.