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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 1:03 am 
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Planning Tribunal Attendee

Joined: Oct 25, 2011
Posts: 1251
KOR101 wrote:
patmackfin wrote:
This silent treatment is a killer,


I'm sure if your offer was close to the amount at which the vendor was willing to sell, you would have heard back.




hang on now.....the auctioneer said he would call back Wednesday, one way or the other. He didn't.

In any business I've ever worked in, if someone says they will call you back Wednesday, then they call you back Wednesday. You wouldnt see that sort of behaviour from a solicitor, a doctor, a bank manager or even dare I say it, a stockbroker.

Its unprofessional, by being uncourteous. Thats all there is to it.


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 2:29 pm 
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Nationalised

Joined: Sep 29, 2010
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Location: London, innit
not related to a sale but complete unprofessional and incompetent - and a shock compared to the hyper EAs in London:

a friend tried to view a rental property with Wyse. Was told that person dealing with this property is "out this week so leave a number and she'll call back next week". How can this be? Surely someone else can show it? Why do landlords put up with it? At least admit she's looking after the kids on Mid-Term instead of saying she hurt her foot!


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 2:33 pm 
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Property Magnate

Joined: Jul 6, 2010
Posts: 501
I found Gerry king in King EA's in Ranelagh to be the worst i've ever dealt with. Shocking simply shocking to deal with.


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2011 2:44 pm 
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Under CAB Investigation

Joined: Jan 18, 2009
Posts: 2550
Location: NWUK
Good way around this might be to call the EA and ask to view another of his properties.

Tell him you're sick of the vendor and are walking away from the other house.

That way you can bring the subject up without blaming him and still get your point across.


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 4:38 pm 
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Homeless

Joined: Oct 3, 2011
Posts: 14
Ive thrown the towel in on this house,I know I am letting emotion get in the way but life is too short to put up with such bullshit, Called the auctioneer today 10 days after he was suppose to call me back.He said"ah the XXX,XXX offer no no", then called me by a different name( I Can not understand these people.(I'm obviously off my head to think that offering 80% of asking is reasonable).Is this an indicator of asking price v selling price?I really doubt it.I now have to practice what I preach,if its supossed to be it will be(or not)


Last edited by patmackfin on Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 5:11 pm 
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Planning Tribunal Attendee

Joined: Oct 25, 2011
Posts: 1251
well at least you got an answer in the end.

Is there a thread for the do's and don'ts of dealing with Irish estate agents. I do believe they are a bit of a unique species and one I would be very wary of; but I also see some pinsters claiming that they know how to deal with them (them being the Irish estate agent, as opposed to any other estate agent).

In addition, can or do estate agents ever tell you there has been a bid when there hasnt been one. If an EA says there is a bid for €XXXk, can it be assumed that there is a bid for that level?


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 7:30 pm 
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I think the "there is already a bid in for €XXX,XXX" is generally a polite way of telling you that bids below that price will not be entertained. It avoids having the buyer get into a "what, my offer isn't good enough for you in this market you are lucky to be getting any offer..." type rant.

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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2011 8:51 pm 
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Homeless

Joined: Oct 3, 2011
Posts: 14
yes I get that,so basically the sellers seem to be the problem,...but If your house has been on the market for say 4 years (and still is)maybe you (the seller)need a reality check as to the "real"market value of your property.You really can't just pull a number out of your a** and wait,thats not selling it's "fishing"(eventually something will bite).These asking prices need to be reevaluated and reductions made every few months until someone "bites" close to your ball park number,assuming you are trying to be proactive in getting the place sold.
Personally I think that if the actual selling prices were available to the public(which they are virtually everywhere else in the world)buyers and sellers would have a realistic ongoing assesment of the "current" market.why isnt this information available in Ireland ?does anyone know who is preventing this information from being readily available to us the public?
a bit fishy.


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 3:27 am 
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Speculator

Joined: Jul 23, 2010
Posts: 401
Quote:
patmackfin wrote:
yes I get that,so basically the sellers seem to be the problem,...but If your house has been on the market for say 4 years (and still is)maybe you (the seller)need a reality check as to the "real"market value of your property.You really can't just pull a number out of your a** and wait,thats not selling it's "fishing"(eventually something will bite).These asking prices need to be reevaluated and reductions made every few months until someone "bites" close to your ball park number,assuming you are trying to be proactive in getting the place sold.
Personally I think that if the actual selling prices were available to the public(which they are virtually everywhere else in the world)buyers and sellers would have a realistic ongoing assesment of the "current" market.why isnt this information available in Ireland ?does anyone know who is preventing this information from being readily available to us the public?
a bit fishy.


I am genuinely amazed that vendors are sitting so long without lowering the prices these days. If you have your house on at x amount and nobody bites... a year later prices have fallen by 20% or whatever and they leave it on at x amount. Another year passes and they don't budge. You get an offer in and the EA laughs at it. It's like a kind of warped horror movie for the willing purchaser

Maybe just the banks saying "You need to sell your house and pay us back" and Joe Vendor-Bloggs says, "If we sell we are homeless and broke so let's just keep the facade of "We are trying to sell and we can't", and leave it priced in Cloud Cuckoo Land figures.."


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 11:36 am 
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Under CAB Investigation

Joined: Aug 2, 2009
Posts: 1513
This has been covered elsewhere in several different forms. Some estate agents have commented on the difficulties of getting sellers to see sense. They have said that some of their number given unrealistic valuations in order to win the business.

I really would like to here more experiences from sellers and from estate agents on how houses are priced and how asking prices are maintained at what appears to many at unreasonable levels for long period of time.

I have said elsewhere that you cannot force people to see at the price you want. Amazement at what to a rational person seems irrational behaviour will not change this. If they are no desperate to sell, then why should they?

I have seen six trophy-style houses in Dublin 6 sell over the last few months for an average of just under €350 per square foot with the highest at €380 and the lowest at €305. The variation is down to factors such as offstreet parking, location and size of garden. In all these cases, the houses required little renovation or investment, other than decoration.

Only one house that I looked at sold for more - around €470 a square foor. This was in Orwell Park.


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 Post subject: Re: unprofessionalism in Ireland(housing)
PostPosted: Tue Nov 08, 2011 1:22 pm 
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Homeless

Joined: Oct 3, 2011
Posts: 14
Everyone is guilty here ,the auctioneers and the sellers.The auctioneers want the business so they tell the seller they can get 450,000 for
a house that might be worth 350,000(amv at an auction for instance),the seller is been told what he wants to hear,the listing agent(auctioneer)is happy to get the listing(for an indefinate period of time it seems,no pressure here) in the states you list for a time period ie 6months...then if its not getting any interest you reduce the price and relist if both parties want to.Here in Ireland they seem to just sign up these houses and .....nothing,thats it...wait and wait and wait.. or forget,I dont know.
another problem(in my opinion)is that each auctioneer is tied to their own listing,and no one else can show that house(other auctioneers)thus only the sellers are being represented professionally/legally.Elsewhere in the world.the house is listed by the auctioneer ,who puts it on a multiple listing service,much like daft,but any other realtor/auctioneer can show and sell that house.In other words I can look at a property and the auctioneer will say if you dont like this house ...what are ypu looking for?and on the my behalf(being the buyer) set up apointments and show any and every house.The commission split is half for the listing agent and half for the buying agent(who brought the buyer).Obviously we cant sell these houses without buyers,so why alienate them? Also in other countries the buyer can look for a home through a buyers representative,who does all the footwork right up to closing on the buyers behalf and gets his/her commision when the sale closes.I think this is a much better fairer way to do business,where everyone is equally represented and helped through the whole stressful process.
The Irish way of selling houses is fast getting the reputation and suspicion of a used car dealership,trying to get rid of the lemons.
Leaving us poor buyers at their mercy.


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