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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:13 pm 
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I think the moral arguments of how and where to invest belong in another thread.

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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:26 pm 
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Luan wrote:
So in your mind, it is acceptable to leave the property you brought under the social and affordable housing scheme empty while renting elsewhere in Dublin.

what is this hypothetical situation to which you refer while trying to extract yourself from the knot you've bound yourself in? I've never rented property in another part of Dublin or Ireland for that matter while owning property elsewhere in the city\state\universe.
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I am also very relieved that my strategy of dealing with high end rental property in the D2/D4 area meets with your approval :)

My experience of seeing people forced out of supposed high end rental property in South County Dublin is that it is only "high end" in terms of price and those priced out tenants would enjoy more comfort in a council house if one were available and they qualified for it.
On leaving certain rented houses which can only be afforded by people earning above the average wage, I've remarked "God, that place is grim" and been thankful to return to the warmth of the car.


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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:28 pm 
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catbear wrote:
I think the moral arguments of how and where to invest belong in another thread.

Mr. I'm considerably wealthier than you is happy to crow about his canny investments in Irish Property in 2012 while here in 2016 Ireland is in the grips of a housing crisis.
Distasteful or what?


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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:39 pm 
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dipole wrote:
catbear wrote:
I think the moral arguments of how and where to invest belong in another thread.

Mr. I'm considerably wealthier than you is happy to crow about his canny investments in Irish Property in 2012 while here in 2016 Ireland is in the grips of a housing crisis.
Distasteful or what?



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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 6:55 pm 
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dipole wrote:
catbear wrote:
I think the moral arguments of how and where to invest belong in another thread.

Mr. I'm considerably wealthier than you is happy to crow about his canny investments in Irish Property in 2012 while here in 2016 Ireland is in the grips of a housing crisis.
Distasteful or what?

As a canny I also bought property in 2005, 2006 and 2007 :)


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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 7:31 pm 
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dipole wrote:
Luan wrote:
I was a strong advocate back in 2012 (when nobody else was buying) that property was a good buy. I backed my mouth with the purchase of 3 residential properties in D2/D4.

and I am a strong advocate to keep out of the residential property market as it is immoral investment when so many Irish people are caught in a rent trap or can't even afford to rent and I backed my mouth by selling my residential property in late 2011 despite not being under any financial pressure to sell.
About the only way to invest morally in Irish property is to invest in a derelict and improve it o that it is habitable or finance the building of new property.


oh spare us the insufferable piety , rents in Dublin are not especially high for a European capital , wages in Dublin are well above the average for a European capital


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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Thu Feb 25, 2016 7:43 pm 
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irish_bob wrote:
oh spare us the insufferable piety , rents in Dublin are not especially high for a European capital , wages in Dublin are well above the average for a European capital

It is not piety; It is observing people close to me suffering because of parasites piling in to an asset class which also doubles as human shelter. I can't tell these people to knuckle down and earn more as they already earn what is considered a reasonable wage within their industry internationally.
Although that wouldn't stop some people here sharing anecdotes about how their immigrant charwoman and her labourer husband can afford to buy in Dublin.

To which European capital does it suit you to compare rents? It is more expenive than Berlin. https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/berlin
Average wages are not average wages for those in the rental trap with no means of escape. There are some older high earners who are playing Monopoly in Dublin.

The ladder has been truely pulled up behind those who clambered on to it when it was within grasp.


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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Fri Feb 26, 2016 11:46 pm 
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dipole wrote:
irish_bob wrote:
oh spare us the insufferable piety , rents in Dublin are not especially high for a European capital , wages in Dublin are well above the average for a European capital

It is not piety; It is observing people close to me suffering because of parasites piling in to an asset class which also doubles as human shelter. I can't tell these people to knuckle down and earn more as they already earn what is considered a reasonable wage within their industry internationally.
Although that wouldn't stop some people here sharing anecdotes about how their immigrant charwoman and her labourer husband can afford to buy in Dublin.

To which European capital does it suit you to compare rents? It is more expenive than Berlin. https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/berlin
Average wages are not average wages for those in the rental trap with no means of escape. There are some older high earners who are playing Monopoly in Dublin.

The ladder has been truely pulled up behind those who clambered on to it when it was within grasp.


Mate your first problem is assuming prices only go upwards.
Every business in the world has been set up to make money. They extract money from the rich and the poor. At the same time, every business is able to make money or loose money. Being a landlord is like any other business.
I've rented places I could never afford to buy, the rental yield was very negative. Thankfully there was a landlord willing to speculate on the asset price and willing to rent it to me.

Your anger should be directed at the government for intervening in the market and central banks for keeping interest rates so low people need to speculate in risky assets to get any sort of return.

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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 1:07 am 
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dipole wrote:
irish_bob wrote:
oh spare us the insufferable piety , rents in Dublin are not especially high for a European capital , wages in Dublin are well above the average for a European capital

It is not piety; It is observing people close to me suffering because of parasites piling in to an asset class which also doubles as human shelter. I can't tell these people to knuckle down and earn more as they already earn what is considered a reasonable wage within their industry internationally.
Although that wouldn't stop some people here sharing anecdotes about how their immigrant charwoman and her labourer husband can afford to buy in Dublin.

To which European capital does it suit you to compare rents? It is more expenive than Berlin. https://www.expatistan.com/cost-of-living/berlin
Average wages are not average wages for those in the rental trap with no means of escape. There are some older high earners who are playing Monopoly in Dublin.

The ladder has been truely pulled up behind those who clambered on to it when it was within grasp.


Rents in Berlin are cheaper because there is less demand. It's not complicated. Majority of Germans rent. Do you consider their landlords immoral?

<SNIP>

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 Post subject: Re: ISEQ: Up or down? - The Stockmarket Thread
PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 1:25 am 
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grumpy wrote:
Rents in Berlin are cheaper because there is less demand.

That's totally wrong anyhow.
Reports in German media show that Germans are thronging to the larger cities and smaller towns are hollowing out.
The German rental sector is heavily regulated to the benefit of both landlord and tenant.


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