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 Post subject: Re: Boom times (2016 Special Edition)
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 3:54 pm 
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Too Big to Fail

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Location: Cathair na dTreabh
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That true? €478 disposable weekly income


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 Post subject: Re: Boom times (2016 Special Edition)
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 4:50 pm 
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Neo Landlord

Joined: Jul 23, 2008
Posts: 297
Location: Dublin
temene wrote:
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That true? €478 disposable weekly income


Nah, we've much more than that now I'm sure, that report is from the Survey of Income and Living Conditions 2017

Just released today.... 8DD

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 Post subject: Re: Boom times (2016 Special Edition)
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 7:37 pm 
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Holiday Home Owner

Joined: Sep 9, 2017
Posts: 336
Well you've no excuse for not paying your debts down so

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 Post subject: Re: Boom times (2016 Special Edition)
PostPosted: Mon Dec 17, 2018 9:16 pm 
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Neo Landlord

Joined: May 21, 2017
Posts: 214
The best of times (almost)!
https://www.irishtimes.com/business/eco ... -1.3734019
The (almost) worst of times!
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social- ... -1.3734346
Pinsters know that "below the poverty line" does not mean "poor". It means "at risk of poverty" which means "counted by the poverty industry". Of course, property has a great deal to do with this:
Quote:
An analysis of consistent poverty rates by tenure status shows that the rate for those living in ‘owned’ dwellings was 3.5% compared with 10.6% for those renting at the market rate and 16.6% for those paying less than the market rate or ‘rent free’
Cause or effect? Some might say getting out of social housing is the best cure for "consistent poverty" but I predict that many more people will live in social housing in the future.
Quote:
At an overall level in 2017, the prevalence of nine of the eleven types of deprivation declined when compared to 2016. The most common types of deprivation experienced were an inability to afford to replace worn out furniture (20.4%), inability to afford to have family or friends for a drink or meal once a month (13.9%) and inability to afford a morning, afternoon or evening out in the last fortnight(13.2%).

Astonishingly, I realise that I grew up in a family that was "at risk of poverty" - we had worn-out furniture a meal out was a rare luxury and we rarely had visitors for dinner. In fact, I would suggest that around 95% of Irish people in the 1960s were "at risk of poverty". Of course, many of those were really poor and we tried to help them out. Nowadays, poverty is another word for "inequality".

Why rely on the media? Here's the full study: https://cso.ie/en/releasesandpublicatio ... ssilc2017/


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 Post subject: Re: Boom times (2016 Special Edition)
PostPosted: Tue Dec 18, 2018 10:58 am 
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Too Big to Fail

Joined: Aug 8, 2008
Posts: 3635
Location: Cathair na dTreabh
temene wrote:
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From 2002 election
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