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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 4:47 am 
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Under CAB Investigation

Joined: Jan 25, 2007
Posts: 1812
slasher wrote:
Luan wrote:
slasher wrote:
Blindjustice BATONEFFECT wrote:
http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/showthread.php?t=2057797911

Landlord converting the sitting room into a bedroom and putting fridges in the bedrooms

isn't this a bedsit?

What is the difference between a bedsit & house share?

Bedsits ae banned? :)

Not any more (possibly).
Bedford have individual kitchen facilities - a fridge would not be sufficient.


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:30 am 
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Nationalised

Joined: Nov 6, 2006
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Location: Hollywood
so it could actually end up worse in some situations!
qualifies for a fresh approach!


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 9:26 am 
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Holiday Home Owner

Joined: Jun 28, 2010
Posts: 331
Landlord converting the sitting room into a bedroom and putting fridges in the bedrooms[/quote]
isn't this a bedsit?[/quote]
What is the difference between a bedsit & house share?[/quote]
Bedsits ae banned? :)
[/quote]
Not any more (possibly).
Bedford have individual kitchen facilities - a fridge would not be sufficient.[/quote]


This has been the misunderstanding all along on this issue. Bedsits were not 'banned' per se- what happened was you could not claim bedsits were self contained accommodation any longer and landlords would have to accept the lower rate of Rent Supplement/HAP payment applicable to a house share


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 10:43 am 
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Too Big to Fail

Joined: Feb 6, 2007
Posts: 4201
temene wrote:

For Dublin, density of housing must increase. For the rest of the country, not as much.

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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:45 am 
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Joined: Sep 29, 2010
Posts: 8788
Location: London, innit
Irish Times editorial : no to high rise just ban AirBnB :roll: i.e. Frank McDonald's line for quite a while

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/edit ... -1.3254893

Quote:
The Minister is mistaken in his view that soaring residential towers should form part of any strategy to deal with the current housing emergency. Veteran British social housing architect Neave Brown, who was presented last week with the Royal Gold Medal for his work, said the Grenfell Tower inferno in London this summer showed that that type of high-rise housing should never have been built and that it ostracised local authority tenants. It is also very expensive to construct, because of the need to provide lifts and a range of safety measures to protect residents – particularly on upper floors – in the event of fire. Thus, any new high-rise housing in Dublin can in no sense be regarded as an answer to homelessness.

Murphy should be looking at other measures – such as a clampdown on the short-letting of “entire homes” as holiday accommodation, via Airbnb and other platforms. Airbnb alone has deducted more than 3,100 dwellings from Dublin’s housing stock, which is equivalent to three times the number available at any given time for letting to live in. Simply introducing a registration system for short-lets, as the Oireachtas housing committee has recommended, falls well short of what’s needed. As in Berlin, we need to recover lost stock by banning the short-letting of entire homes. This would yield much more practical returns than entertaining fantasies about reaching for the sky.


the line about high rise not being a solution to homelessness is either disingenuous or cretinous; supply is needed everywhere in the market


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 11:59 am 
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Holiday Home Owner

Joined: Jun 28, 2010
Posts: 331
slasher wrote:
Irish Times editorial : no to high rise just ban AirBnB :roll: i.e. Frank McDonald's line for quite a while

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/edit ... -1.3254893

Quote:
The Minister is mistaken in his view that soaring residential towers should form part of any strategy to deal with the current housing emergency. Veteran British social housing architect Neave Brown, who was presented last week with the Royal Gold Medal for his work, said the Grenfell Tower inferno in London this summer showed that that type of high-rise housing should never have been built and that it ostracised local authority tenants. It is also very expensive to construct, because of the need to provide lifts and a range of safety measures to protect residents – particularly on upper floors – in the event of fire. Thus, any new high-rise housing in Dublin can in no sense be regarded as an answer to homelessness.

Murphy should be looking at other measures – such as a clampdown on the short-letting of “entire homes” as holiday accommodation, via Airbnb and other platforms. Airbnb alone has deducted more than 3,100 dwellings from Dublin’s housing stock, which is equivalent to three times the number available at any given time for letting to live in. Simply introducing a registration system for short-lets, as the Oireachtas housing committee has recommended, falls well short of what’s needed. As in Berlin, we need to recover lost stock by banning the short-letting of entire homes. This would yield much more practical returns than entertaining fantasies about reaching for the sky.


the line about high rise not being a solution to homelessness is either disingenuous or cretinous; supply is needed everywhere in the market


As ever the devil is in the detail but it is well known that residential streets of duplexes 3/4 stories high can achieve the same density as high rise condos. here and in the UK the ability to create the obvious seems to have been lost to antiquity :(


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 12:12 pm 
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Joined: Sep 29, 2010
Posts: 8788
Location: London, innit
tommyt wrote:
slasher wrote:
Irish Times editorial : no to high rise just ban AirBnB :roll: i.e. Frank McDonald's line for quite a while

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/edit ... -1.3254893

Quote:
The Minister is mistaken in his view that soaring residential towers should form part of any strategy to deal with the current housing emergency. Veteran British social housing architect Neave Brown, who was presented last week with the Royal Gold Medal for his work, said the Grenfell Tower inferno in London this summer showed that that type of high-rise housing should never have been built and that it ostracised local authority tenants. It is also very expensive to construct, because of the need to provide lifts and a range of safety measures to protect residents – particularly on upper floors – in the event of fire. Thus, any new high-rise housing in Dublin can in no sense be regarded as an answer to homelessness.

Murphy should be looking at other measures – such as a clampdown on the short-letting of “entire homes” as holiday accommodation, via Airbnb and other platforms. Airbnb alone has deducted more than 3,100 dwellings from Dublin’s housing stock, which is equivalent to three times the number available at any given time for letting to live in. Simply introducing a registration system for short-lets, as the Oireachtas housing committee has recommended, falls well short of what’s needed. As in Berlin, we need to recover lost stock by banning the short-letting of entire homes. This would yield much more practical returns than entertaining fantasies about reaching for the sky.


the line about high rise not being a solution to homelessness is either disingenuous or cretinous; supply is needed everywhere in the market


As ever the devil is in the detail but it is well known that residential streets of duplexes 3/4 stories high can achieve the same density as high rise condos. here and in the UK the ability to create the obvious seems to have been lost to antiquity :(


but some of us are OK with tall buildings!! I've lived in the 16th story of a 24+ story building, if the people there are "normal" owners/private tenants it's not an issue - the IT wants to rule it out .

why not the 5/6/7 story buildings like in Barcelona's Eixample - with green space in the middle (sort of) -

at least then you get economies of scale that make a regular caretaker viable and they're tall enough that the upper stories become particularly desirable, the quasi-suburban 3 story duplexes in Stepaside/Adamstown etc are a mess with everyone parking cars all over the place


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 12:57 pm 
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Neo Landlord

Joined: Aug 19, 2010
Posts: 237

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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 1:00 pm 
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Neo Landlord

Joined: Aug 19, 2010
Posts: 237
Or for those who prefer their information via TED talks... The principles themselves start at 9:55


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 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Oct 19, 2017 1:16 pm 
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Holiday Home Owner

Joined: Jun 28, 2010
Posts: 331
slasher wrote:
tommyt wrote:
slasher wrote:
Irish Times editorial : no to high rise just ban AirBnB :roll: i.e. Frank McDonald's line for quite a while

https://www.irishtimes.com/opinion/edit ... -1.3254893

Quote:
The Minister is mistaken in his view that soaring residential towers should form part of any strategy to deal with the current housing emergency. Veteran British social housing architect Neave Brown, who was presented last week with the Royal Gold Medal for his work, said the Grenfell Tower inferno in London this summer showed that that type of high-rise housing should never have been built and that it ostracised local authority tenants. It is also very expensive to construct, because of the need to provide lifts and a range of safety measures to protect residents – particularly on upper floors – in the event of fire. Thus, any new high-rise housing in Dublin can in no sense be regarded as an answer to homelessness.

Murphy should be looking at other measures – such as a clampdown on the short-letting of “entire homes” as holiday accommodation, via Airbnb and other platforms. Airbnb alone has deducted more than 3,100 dwellings from Dublin’s housing stock, which is equivalent to three times the number available at any given time for letting to live in. Simply introducing a registration system for short-lets, as the Oireachtas housing committee has recommended, falls well short of what’s needed. As in Berlin, we need to recover lost stock by banning the short-letting of entire homes. This would yield much more practical returns than entertaining fantasies about reaching for the sky.


the line about high rise not being a solution to homelessness is either disingenuous or cretinous; supply is needed everywhere in the market


As ever the devil is in the detail but it is well known that residential streets of duplexes 3/4 stories high can achieve the same density as high rise condos. here and in the UK the ability to create the obvious seems to have been lost to antiquity :(


but some of us are OK with tall buildings!! I've lived in the 16th story of a 24+ story building, if the people there are "normal" owners/private tenants it's not an issue - the IT wants to rule it out .

why not the 5/6/7 story buildings like in Barcelona's Eixample - with green space in the middle (sort of) -

at least then you get economies of scale that make a regular caretaker viable and they're tall enough that the upper stories become particularly desirable, the quasi-suburban 3 story duplexes in Stepaside/Adamstown etc are a mess with everyone parking cars all over the place


I largely agree with you but I wasn't thinking of the likes of Adamstown which imo does not have streets- it has wide distributor roads and cul de sacs which are a suburban typology.


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