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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2014 12:55 am 
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Single Home Owner

Joined: Dec 11, 2007
Posts: 129
Location: out of harms way
vincem wrote:
mr_anderson wrote:
I'm an ex-stockbroker myself and the DeVere's name is reasonably well known in that industry.
I think they are a South African outfit.
Never dealt with them mind you, but I certainly wouldn't perceive them as a dodgy institution.
They would be well established.
Always bear in mind though, it's not the institution you are dealing with, but the individual broker.
Some are good, some not.

But regardless, a 7.2% interest rate just sounds wrong.
I can only think the money is being invested in high-yielding corporate bonds (or similar).
Just sounds too good to be true.

If you want, I can give you the name of a UK stockbroker who I would perceive as being good enough to manage my money (if i had any :P ). He won't give you the hard sell.


If the OP has 100K to invest his first objective should be educate himself both on investments and on what exactly he is paying a broker for



I agree with you Vincem, if there is one message that I have always valued with the pin it is to go into things with your eyes open. Time flies however and though I'm delighted that I've put a few quid together what to do next is something of a challenge for those of us for whom what to do next is a challenge. Its something of a tyranny of choice for the uninitiated but the advice I've received in the last 24 hours has done a lot to get the ball rolling. To that end I'd appreciate it if you could pm me the details of the broker you mentioned above Mr A.

Noljakka


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Tue Nov 11, 2014 2:25 pm 
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First Time Buyer

Joined: Mar 23, 2012
Posts: 99
Noljakka wrote:
vincem wrote:
mr_anderson wrote:
I'm an ex-stockbroker myself and the DeVere's name is reasonably well known in that industry.
I think they are a South African outfit.
Never dealt with them mind you, but I certainly wouldn't perceive them as a dodgy institution.
They would be well established.
Always bear in mind though, it's not the institution you are dealing with, but the individual broker.
Some are good, some not.

But regardless, a 7.2% interest rate just sounds wrong.
I can only think the money is being invested in high-yielding corporate bonds (or similar).
Just sounds too good to be true.

If you want, I can give you the name of a UK stockbroker who I would perceive as being good enough to manage my money (if i had any :P ). He won't give you the hard sell.


If the OP has 100K to invest his first objective should be educate himself both on investments and on what exactly he is paying a broker for



I agree with you Vincem, if there is one message that I have always valued with the pin it is to go into things with your eyes open. Time flies however and though I'm delighted that I've put a few quid together what to do next is something of a challenge for those of us for whom what to do next is a challenge. Its something of a tyranny of choice for the uninitiated but the advice I've received in the last 24 hours has done a lot to get the ball rolling. To that end I'd appreciate it if you could pm me the details of the broker you mentioned above Mr A.

Noljakka



Your welcome and good luck with the broker - remember his priorities are not necessarily matched to yours, and prompt him that you are interested in low cost index funds, you can mention HSBC or Vanguard. Either of these companies may even be contacted directly depending on the amount of money you plan to invest.
Sorry about the broker bashing, no offence meant to anyone in the business.

PS - ETF's are also worth a mention

http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/inve ... funds.html


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Fri Nov 14, 2014 7:52 pm 
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First Time Buyer

Joined: Mar 23, 2012
Posts: 99
vincem wrote:
mr_anderson wrote:
I'm an ex-stockbroker myself and the DeVere's name is reasonably well known in that industry.
I think they are a South African outfit.
Never dealt with them mind you, but I certainly wouldn't perceive them as a dodgy institution.
They would be well established.
Always bear in mind though, it's not the institution you are dealing with, but the individual broker.
Some are good, some not.

But regardless, a 7.2% interest rate just sounds wrong.
I can only think the money is being invested in high-yielding corporate bonds (or similar).
Just sounds too good to be true.

If you want, I can give you the name of a UK stockbroker who I would perceive as being good enough to manage my money (if i had any :P ). He won't give you the hard sell.



If the OP has 100K to invest his first objective should be educate himself both on investments and on what exactly he is paying a broker for




Not sure if this is a coincidence but Devere's gets a mention here

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/invest ... un-goofed/


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2015 11:29 am 
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Too Big to Fail

Joined: Feb 6, 2007
Posts: 4201
Ixelles wrote:
I got chatting to a guy from DeVere's a few years ago and, somehow, ended up having over for tea and a chat one evening - which lasted three hours. He was Irish, we were abroad, it all seemed to happen organically but for all I know they ingeniously targeted us with their local Irish guy. Not that we were/are rich but they probably reckoned that as expats we had a few quid. Again, they were overestimating us but that's beside the point.

In hindsight, it's embarrassing that we even let the chap across the threshold. I remember thinking that if we went for what he was suggesting and it all went pear-shaped, I would sound like an idiot on the subsequent Prime Time Investigates programme. The Pin would be mocking me for page after page. 'He said we'd make big interest, reduce our tax bill and there was [almost] no risk...'.

I had Googled them too and, like you, mostly found articles by disgruntled 'employees' - mostly working independently under the DeVere name and occasionally being charged for training courses which they believed to be overpriced. They don't seem to have a trail of burned investors.

After the first few minutes of this epic kitchen table chat we had already decided we were not interested. What he was offering just wasn't for us. It was all about locking up a lot of money for a long time and the fees were not easy (for me) to understand. We wanted to keep whatever money we had for an eventual property purchase (still pending!) but he went on at great length about an endowment-style education fund for the kid(s) - only had one at that time - and wouldn't take "leave it with us" for an answer. We were too polite about it - mainly because he was Irish and probably knows my Mam or her friend or my sister's boss or something. Eventually, we got him out the door and agreed not to invite sales people around for tea any more. Still feel silly about it.

Then there were follow up calls, to which I said 'Nah, it's really not for us'. He said 'well the least you can do is give me the names of five expats who might be interested'. I did - in me eye. Then a call came from an English guy explaining that my contact had left the company but they still wanted five names of friends/colleagues. I didn't cooperate and eventually they gave up - after a few more calls/emails. Funny thing is that the guy who we'd had over for tea kinda vanished. There's now no trace of him online and his LinkedIn profile disappeared after he parted with the company....

I asked a friend who works in financial services if he had heard of DeVere and he said there was nothing specifically bad about them. But all their products were so long-term that it's still early days. The product they were pushing to us was run by a German fund so it seemed like there would be plenty of people taking a slice along the way. And we had said we were relatively risk averse (compared to some of the products they were offering with v. high yields) so this German thing was meant to make us feel better about it all.

Not sure that helps but there ye go! Nothing terrible happened, they didn't plague us with calls, but there were fairly hard sell.

Sounds very Glengarry Glen Ross.

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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2015 12:54 pm 
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Planning Tribunal Attendee

Joined: Dec 16, 2007
Posts: 1413
If you are investing ETFs are probably the way to go, vanguard as suggested above are the cheapest. Fixed return are the safest and cheapest don't expect great yield.

I have no idea where to make a good investment these days and I am not convinced the stock market offers good value. Trying to make a prediction as to where the world will be in ten years makes my head hurt.

Maybe invest in yourself in some way?


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 6:30 pm 
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Planning Tribunal Attendee

Joined: Feb 19, 2014
Posts: 1380
On the general topic of equity advice, a good, reliable and transparent source is "Seeking Alpha", if you have time to read even a tiny fraction of their considerable output.

It's considered the creme de la creme of free crowd sourced opinion, and much like Wiki, analysts have found it just as reliable as the stuff you pay for. They have 8,500+ people writing for them, and they pay them on different tiered scales. Once you register/sign up you can subscribe to a wide variety of daily emails cut and diced by sector/country etc. You'll never be able to read them all.

Quote:
Seeking Alpha is a crowd sourced content service for financial markets .[1] Articles and research covers a broad range of stocks, asset classes, ETFs and investment strategies. In contrast to other equity research platforms, insight is provided by contributor base of investors and industry experts (Buy-side) rather than sell side.[2][3] Seeking Alpha was founded in 2004 by former Wall Street analyst, David Jackson.[4] The company reports it has distribution partnerships with MSN Money, CNBC, Yahoo Finance, MarketWatch, Nasdaq and TheStreet.[5] However, Yahoo Finance chose to end its relationship with Seeking Alpha on July 28, 2014.[6] [7]

As of February 2014, Seeking Alpha had 3 million registered users, and attracted 8 million unique viewers a month.[8][9]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seeking_Alpha

http://seekingalpha.com/


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 8:06 pm 
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Too Big to Fail

Joined: Jan 12, 2008
Posts: 4081
Location: California
Noljakka wrote:
Many thanks Vincem, solid advise. I'll look into Vanguard.


+1. I use these funds for 401k and find them to be good. At the v low end for fees, easy to switch around funds without penalties and easy to mix it up between equities/regions/bonds/etc.


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2015 9:57 pm 
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Planning Tribunal Attendee

Joined: Dec 16, 2007
Posts: 1413
CBMD wrote:
On the general topic of equity advice, a good, reliable and transparent source is "Seeking Alpha", if you have time to read even a tiny fraction of their considerable output.

It's considered the creme de la creme of free crowd sourced opinion, and much like Wiki, analysts have found it just as reliable as the stuff you pay for. They have 8,500+ people writing for them, and they pay them on different tiered scales. Once you register/sign up you can subscribe to a wide variety of daily emails cut and diced by sector/country etc. You'll never be able to read them all.

Quote:
Seeking Alpha is a crowd sourced content service for financial markets .[1] Articles and research covers a broad range of stocks, asset classes, ETFs and investment strategies. In contrast to other equity research platforms, insight is provided by contributor base of investors and industry experts (Buy-side) rather than sell side.[2][3] Seeking Alpha was founded in 2004 by former Wall Street analyst, David Jackson.[4] The company reports it has distribution partnerships with MSN Money, CNBC, Yahoo Finance, MarketWatch, Nasdaq and TheStreet.[5] However, Yahoo Finance chose to end its relationship with Seeking Alpha on July 28, 2014.[6] [7]

As of February 2014, Seeking Alpha had 3 million registered users, and attracted 8 million unique viewers a month.[8][9]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seeking_Alpha

http://seekingalpha.com/


I think you are largely wasting your time with this kind of micro financial analysis. It's impossible to predict the future and index funds have been found to equal informed professional investors.

My own maxim is to try and predict global trends (almost impossible see Nassim Taleb) and then just buy a generic etf in those areas. Then enjoy the sun. Too much analysis is counterproductive for multiple reasons including the delusion that you are in some way informed. How accurate is the data set.... It's almost impossible to answer this question.


Last edited by dkin on Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:13 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 5:20 am 
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Planning Tribunal Attendee

Joined: Feb 19, 2014
Posts: 1380
dkin wrote:
CBMD wrote:
On the general topic of equity advice, a good, reliable and transparent source is "Seeking Alpha", if you have time to read even a tiny fraction of their considerable output.

It's considered the creme de la creme of free crowd sourced opinion, and much like Wiki, analysts have found it just as reliable as the stuff you pay for. They have 8,500+ people writing for them, and they pay them on different tiered scales. Once you register/sign up you can subscribe to a wide variety of daily emails cut and diced by sector/country etc. You'll never be able to read them all.

Quote:
Seeking Alpha is a crowd sourced content service for financial markets .[1] Articles and research covers a broad range of stocks, asset classes, ETFs and investment strategies. In contrast to other equity research platforms, insight is provided by contributor base of investors and industry experts (Buy-side) rather than sell side.[2][3] Seeking Alpha was founded in 2004 by former Wall Street analyst, David Jackson.[4] The company reports it has distribution partnerships with MSN Money, CNBC, Yahoo Finance, MarketWatch, Nasdaq and TheStreet.[5] However, Yahoo Finance chose to end its relationship with Seeking Alpha on July 28, 2014.[6] [7]

As of February 2014, Seeking Alpha had 3 million registered users, and attracted 8 million unique viewers a month.[8][9]


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seeking_Alpha

http://seekingalpha.com/


I think you are largely wasting your time with this kind of micro financial analysis. It's impossible to predict the future and index funds have been found to equal informed professional investors.

My own maxim is to try and predict global trends (almost impossible see Nassim Taleb) and then just buy a generic etf in those areas. Then enjoy the sun. Too much analysis is counterproductive for multiple reasons including the delusion that you are in some way informed. How accurate is the data set.... It's almost impossible to answer this question.

I'd guess that most of the three million who've signed up to SA would disagree with you. Some people allocate funds to different sectors and seek advice on more than one category of investment. If people have the time, money, interest, and desire, I don't see the harm.

Every investor is not passive.It's designed for the hands on active investor. The various index funds haven't exactly being setting the world on fire lately.

There is I think, in the US, a stronger tradition of activist investor than in EU. The Value Line Survey with which SA competes directly, has been around since 1930 and has about 300,000 subscribers who pay between $200-$1,000 a year.

http://www.valueline.com/about/aboutvalueline.aspx


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 Post subject: Re: Investment Advice
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2015 6:50 am 
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Too Big to Fail

Joined: Jan 12, 2008
Posts: 4081
Location: California
I did a lot of research and writing for one of these newsletters many years ago and in my experience many of the subscribers are pros, and or fairly well off people who devote most of their work time to their finances. Obviously the web has brought many many more people into the stock picking game which is why you now have many more publications available for free. But managing investments is a time consuming exercise which is why there is an enormous business in doing it for people. I think the point about having too much micro info is a good one; it's beyond the scope of most people with jobs to keep up with whats going on in a sector never mind industries, and analyzing info and trends takes more than just lots of information. There is a reason almost every article on seeking alpha type newsletters has a list of warnings at the bottom. Fun to read though.


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