Board index » The IRISH PROPERTY BUBBLE » The Republic of Property

Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 938 posts ]  [Go to page]   Previous  1 ... 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71 ... 94  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Wed Nov 01, 2017 11:16 am 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation

Joined: May 2, 2008
Posts: 1613
Location: Ireland
slasher wrote:
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/courts/high-court/house-a-scene-of-pure-chaos-and-destruction-court-told-1.3275823

not sure if best thread but ...

Quote:
House a scene of ‘pure chaos and destruction’, court told
Woman suing council over condition of house, claiming it nominated tenants


A woman has told the High Court a house in south Dublin she rented out to a family of five was a scene of “pure chaos and destruction” when she regained it.

Joanne Penston said that when she re-entered her three-bedroom house at Rollins Villas, Sallynoggin, five years later in 2013, “every square and every corner” were damaged.

There were holes in the walls, a bed was cut in half and there were mattresses in the garden which was covered in rubbish as the tenants had not used wheelie bins, she said. Copper piping and floorboards had been removed and many windows and all the doors in the house were damaged and were off their hinges, she said.
Blood and other fluids were on the floors, which were also covered in material ranging from needles and broken glass beer bottles to broken toys, she said. There were no furnishings left and the upstairs toilet did not function.
“I don’t know how anyone could inhabit the house, let alone children,” she said. “Everything was broken.”
Ms Penston, a childcare worker, claims almost €70,000 worth of damage was done and she still owes money for the repair work. A Garda who came to the house shortly after the tenants left would not enter it and she could not get anyone to clean up the garden, she said.

Rental accommodation scheme

In her proceedings, Ms Penston, who has resumed living in the property, claims she had entered into agreements with Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council, known as the rental accommodation scheme (RAS), in respect of the tenancy, involving the council paying the rent.

She claims the council nominated the tenants, who took up residency by early 2008, and had represented to her they were suitable tenants and had been vetted. She relied on those representations when entering into the letting agreements, she claims.

The tenants did not take care of the property and the representations made to her by the council were false and negligently made, she alleges.

Ms Penston, represented by Mark de Blacam SC, has sued the council, seeking damages for alleged negligence. She claims the council is liable for damage caused by the tenant, other than wear and tear.
Represented by Denis McDonald SC, the council denies liability. It denies it nominated the tenants and claims they were in occupation before April 2008, when the tenancy agreement was entered into between the council and the landlord.
The council also denies it made any of the alleged representations to Ms Penston or that it was negligent or in breach of its duty of care to her.
The case continues before Ms Justice Marie Baker.


The system is broken somewhere. The last person responsible for the above is the landlord.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:23 am 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Aug 8, 2008
Posts: 3637
Location: Cathair na dTreabh
RentPressureZones forcing landlords to exit market and make tenants homeless
Since the RPZs were introduced, landlords are abandoning RAS and Leasing Schemes for local authority tenants.
Landlords have also threatened legal action against the Council, claiming breach of contract due to the new legislation which curbs the amount of rents they can charge.
“Since the introduction of these new measures, numerous landlords have decided to withdraw from these schemes and other have indicated that they will do so, based on the fact that the City Council are not adhering to the terms and conditions of the contracts governing the arrangements supplying these houses, specifically the rent review clauses in the contracts, which are based on prevailing market rates.”



I'm sure it is affecting private tenants equally too.
Well done, well done
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Tue Nov 07, 2017 11:38 am 
Offline
Nationalised

Joined: Oct 29, 2007
Posts: 11790
Location: Multiverse
slasher wrote:
https://www.irishtimes.com/news/crime-and-law/courts/high-court/house-a-scene-of-pure-chaos-and-destruction-court-told-1.3275823

not sure if best thread but ...

Quote:
House a scene of ‘pure chaos and destruction’, court told
Woman suing council over condition of house, claiming it nominated tenants


A woman has told the High Court a house in south Dublin she rented out to a family of five was a scene of “pure chaos and destruction” when she regained it.

Joanne Penston said that when she re-entered her three-bedroom house at Rollins Villas, Sallynoggin, five years later in 2013, “every square and every corner” were damaged.

There were holes in the walls, a bed was cut in half and there were mattresses in the garden which was covered in rubbish as the tenants had not used wheelie bins, she said. Copper piping and floorboards had been removed and many windows and all the doors in the house were damaged and were off their hinges, she said.
Blood and other fluids were on the floors, which were also covered in material ranging from needles and broken glass beer bottles to broken toys, she said. There were no furnishings left and the upstairs toilet did not function.
“I don’t know how anyone could inhabit the house, let alone children,” she said. “Everything was broken.”


Even before the mention of needles, the moment I hear of copper piping being removed it brings me back to a previous experience of mine ...

http://www.thepropertypin.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=66555&p=901639&hilit=#p901639

Remember folks, it's now illegal for a landlord to refuse these fine, upstanding members of the community accommodation.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Wed Nov 08, 2017 1:36 pm 
Offline
Too Big to Fail

Joined: Aug 8, 2008
Posts: 3637
Location: Cathair na dTreabh
Govt not bothered to enforce existing regulations enough
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Thu Nov 09, 2017 7:01 am 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation

Joined: May 12, 2012
Posts: 2183
Those headline 'compliance' figures are misleading.

Non-provision of a microwave by a landlord is in breach of the law.

There is a world of difference between this and persistent damp issues.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 1:36 pm 
Offline
Nationalised
User avatar

Joined: May 13, 2008
Posts: 11764
Location: Somewhere up in the hills
Image

We're being governed by morons.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Fri Nov 10, 2017 10:50 pm 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation

Joined: May 12, 2012
Posts: 2183
Cool picture Hansel.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 9:54 am 
Offline
Nationalised
User avatar

Joined: May 13, 2008
Posts: 11764
Location: Somewhere up in the hills
Media reports of homelessness crisis 'damaging to Ireland's international reputation', claims Junior Housing Minister Damien English (FG)

Quote:
"Some of this narrative has seeped into international coverage of our housing system and is damaging to Ireland's international reputation, that our social response to this issue is being portrayed as dysfunctional," he said.


It is dysfunctional. The Housing policy of this government is attracting international media attention because it is so stupid and inept.

In other news Ireland has built 1093 social housing units in almost two years since January 2016. The Housing List currently stands at 120,598 households.

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Wed Nov 15, 2017 1:29 pm 
Offline
Nationalised
User avatar

Joined: Jan 1, 1970
Posts: 23261
Coles2 wrote:
Image

We're being governed by morons.


They get into the water while Rome burns. :|

_________________
Follow The Pin - https://twitter.com/dailypinster

"Politicians are always realistically maneuvering for the next election. They are obsolete as fundamental problem-solvers." - Buckminster Fuller

"I was comfortable with a couple of banks being married today, instead i wake up and find I'm married to the banks." - Catbear

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Grappling with the housing crisis: Fresh approaches need
PostPosted: Sun Nov 26, 2017 5:16 pm 
Offline
Under CAB Investigation

Joined: Dec 2, 2013
Posts: 2739
FreeFallin wrote:
If ever evidence something was needed to deal with this crisis, one way or another, this case in the courts today!
https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/c ... 61412.html
Quote:
DUBLIN City Council is paying €2,640 monthly for hotel accommodation three nights weekly for a separated homeless father and his three children rather than give him €1,500 housing assistance monthly to rent an apartment, the High Court has been told.
The man claims the Council is operating an unfair, irrational and discriminatory housing scheme in classifying separated fathers as “single” persons when allocating housing.
The scheme breaches his rights, including to equal treatment, under the Constitution and the European Convention on Human Rights Act, he claims.

Aged in his twenties, homeless and unemployed, the man has access to and custody of his three young children for three days and three nights weekly.
Because the Council classifies him as a “single” man for housing allocation, he can only get €990 monthly Housing Assistance Payment (HAP).

He says he has sourced an apartment for a monthly rent of €1,500 but, rather than recognising him as a separated father and increasing his HAP to meet that rent, the Council pays €660 weekly to fund hotel accommodation for himself and his children for three nights.
On the other four nights, he sources homeless accommodation for himself while the children stay with their mother, also homeless, in hotel accommodation also funded by the Council.

The Council has assessed his ex partner, based on her status as a separated mother, as entitled to up to €1,900 HAP, he says. This unfairly differentiated between him as the children's father and their mother as neither parent has the children on a full-time basis and instead share the custody and access, he alleges. ...
...In court documents, it was stated the man gets Jobseekers Allowance of €193 weekly, plus a €60 weekly access payment....
...he parents presented with their children to the Council’s homeless unit in early 2017 and were housed together in emergency hotel accommodation. The man and his partner separated in summer 2017 but remain on amicable terms and have agreed access arrangements between themselves, it was stated.

So a couple with 3 kids split up and decide to share custody. She gets up to 1,900 per month for accommodation. He's seeking 1,500 for his gaff whilst being unemployed in Dublin where there is practically full employment and is getting over 1,000 per month dole. And i'd be fairly sure she's on unemployment or single mothers payments etc.
This couple, if he wins his case (which I'm sure we're all paying for his legal team) could end up with accomm costs of 41k per year because they decided to go their sperate ways, lets say 25k or so in dole/single mothers allowance, childrens allowance of 5k and I'm sure there's more top-ups etc along the way. North of 70k per year.
This madness will eventually blow up...unless they do another pension raid on workers retirement funds to keep the charade afloat


This post sticks in my head.

For the last 10 years we've had people like Alan Kelly, Simon Coveney, Eoghan Murphy and almost all politicians grappling with the idea of social housing. But they all come, to a greater or even greater extent from a background of inherited wealth and expectation that they'll own their own home and their children will.

But there's a lot of people who ^ is not the background or the aspiration. They want a "forever home" but have no capacity to get it off their own or family's wealth and for many there are solid incentives to make their case as hopeless as they can put up with in the short term. More dependents = more need = higher ranking on the list. It's not a queue, it's a list. They don't want to live in a hotel for 20 years obviously. They also have no notion of emigrating. That traditional Irish solution to a lack of opportunity never ever comes up in the conversations that the needy have with the media. Or among themselves, presumably.

So you have this amazing situation of massive outlay for homeless and HAP. And the people tasked with solving it are on a different planet to those they're policy making for.


Top
 Profile  
 



Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 938 posts ]  [Go to page]   Previous  1 ... 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71 ... 94  Next

    Board index » The IRISH PROPERTY BUBBLE » The Republic of Property

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 6 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum

Jump to:  

Follow, Retweet @dailypinster



Pyramid Built, Is Better Built! - Latest Property Discussions www.thepropertypin.com